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Fuz Reviews Season 20: A Pretentious The Voice Anthology


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26 minutes ago, Misirlou said:

By the way, Slezak clearly showed his biases as well. He LOVED Jeffrey Austin. I dont think he gave him lest than an A- throughout the show.


He gave him a C- for O Holy Night in the finale. The same thing with Ali Caldwell with 9 to 5. He also loved Kimberly Nichole and Jacque Lee. Even though he would grade his favorites higher, he knew when they had a dud. Even then, he wouldn’t grade decent performances very low, and wouldn’t give bad performances good scores (B- was pretty good for Slezak, but when a contestant who consistently got A’s slipped down there, you knew it was one of their weakest). Slezak’s grading started in playoffs usually, unlike Mason. And IDF usually liked the contestants he was biased towards (unlike Mason)
 

I think his harsher scale also made it more forgivable if you didn’t completely agree with a grade. 

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3 minutes ago, Cookie73 said:


He gave him a C- for O Holy Night in the finale. The same thing with Ali Caldwell with 9 to 5. He also loved Kimberly Nichole and Jacque Lee. Even though he would grade his favorites higher, he knew when they had a dud. Even then, he wouldn’t grade decent performances very low, and wouldn’t give bad performances good scores (B- was pretty good for Slezak, but when a contestant who consistently got A’s slipped down there, you knew it was one of their weakest). Slezak’s grading started in playoffs usually, unlike Mason. And IDF usually liked the contestants he was biased towards (unlike Mason)
 

I think his harsher scale also made it more forgivable if you didn’t completely agree with a grade. 

Oh, I didn´t know that, but I do agree with what you say (although I personally think he still graded Jacquie Lee too high on a couple of performances), he definitely comes to term with his biases and gives credit where credit is due. He wasn´t a big fan of Jordan but gave him an A+ for "Somebody to Love", completely deserved.

 

He also hated Taylor John Williams with a passion, but he actually gave him an A once for what I believe was indeed his best performance. 

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hey y'all, a heads up; I will likely not be able to finish these in time for the show to be over! expect my ranking of the episode to be out a few hours after the end of the show.

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6 minutes ago, peachfuz said:

hey y'all, a heads up; I will likely not be able to finish these in time for the show to be over! expect my ranking of the episode to be out a few hours after the end of the show.

No pressure, take all the time you need!

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Posted (edited)

Fuz Reviews Season 20: A Pretentious The Voice Anthology

The Playoffs: Pity for Pity's Sake

•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•☾☼☽•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:

TEAM KELLY

Corey Ward • Lewis Capaldi’s “Bruises” • Grade: B+

With Capaldi’s lion’s roar of a ballad handed to the most emotionally potent voice left in the competition, I went into this opening performance with two expectations; that it would take a mountain-moving vocal to top his intimate “Already Gone” a few weeks ago, and that Corey’s voice was big enough to handle a song of this size. Sure enough, Corey took the song and just nearly owned it, emoting with 100% of his being while rising from a tremulous opening to the howl of the chorus. As someone who’s adored the returnee since the premiere, I can say with full confidence that, vocally, this was far from Corey’s finest moment–the first chorus teetered on the edge of yelly, and he seemed so overcome by the bridge that he straight up lost control of his falsetto. Thankfully, Corey acquitted himself, and the final declaration of the song was done with control and absolute fervor. It was far from perfect, but this was a performance that earned him a spot in the Top 9 next week.
 
Gihanna Zoë • Lady Gaga's “Always Remember Us This Way” • Grade: B-
I came into this performance with far more optimism than I expected I would have when I first heard Gihanna; I wasn't convinced on her vocal ability until her stunning rendition of "Glitter in the Air" back in the Knockouts. That said, A Star Is Born's swan song seemed to be a size or two too big for Gihanna's gentle vocal stylings; this seemed more like a job for Team Legend's Zania, no? On stage, Gihanna started with such delicacy that it felt like she was just barely grazing the lyric. As the song grew bigger, Gihanna did as well... although not exactly in conjunction with the song itself. Her vocal was strong, but, as a whole, the song demands a lot of maturity and bombast, and Gihanna, as great a vocalist she is, doesn't fill the space that Always Remember requires for someone to shine. Not to say it was a bad vocal–aside from a few hinky notes and what seemed to be a general audio issue, it was certainly passable. I just wonder if passable is enough at this point in the competition–and on a team as strong like this.
 
Zae Romeo • Miley Cyrus' "When I Look At You" • Grade: C
Listen, I'm not gonna pretend that Zae hasn't been one of my favorites all season–for good reason, too, considering I think his track record this season has been about as spotless as Team Blake's Cam Anthony. As such, you could imagine how my expectations crumbled before my eyes when Zae took to the live stage and his voice, once fluid as a glass of water, sounded about as pleasant to the ears as a rock inside of a blender. So much rasp was driven into his Miley Cyrus cover that, to the ear, he was nearly unrecognizable... and I'm afraid that's not a good thing. Zae's vocal was rough tonight; although his opening verses showed promise, he seemed to generally struggle with his range more than he has all season, and the song seemed overwrought, almost unpleasant at times. Wasn't this the guy who pretty much reinvented "Electric Love" last we see him? Love the guy to death, but he's in trouble tonight, I worry.
 
Kenzie Wheeler • Brooks and Dunn's "Red Dirt Road" • Grade: A-
As someone who's never really clicked with country artists in the first place, Kenzie's performance tonight made me wonder if it was the genre that I didn't like, or the lack of impressiveness exhibited by his predecessors, because damn! The Floridan injected so much wistful storytelling into his homage to Brooks and Dunn, and his vocal was nothing but resonant. If I have a single gripe with Wheeler, it's his presentation as a performer; great as he is as a vocalist, he looks about as excited to be onstage as a teenager earning money during his summer afternoons as a Chuck E. Cheese mascot boy. Love the guy's vocals, but I'd love to love watching him just as much. If he can address the showmanship, however? He'd be a legitimate–and absolutely deserving–candidate for Carter Rubin's crown.
(That said, would love for the Voice team to get their shit together and tighten up the sound mix; Kenzie was one of several vocalists who were affected for the worse by it. Isn't the point that we're supposed to, I dunno, hear them?)
 
TEAM LEGEND
Ryleigh Modig • Olivia Rodrigo's "drivers' license" • Grade: A-
Ryleigh's musical stylings are intricate, fluttery, and sweet as candy on the best songs... but her Knockout was a strong indication of her need for the best songs in order for her to truly shine. Thankfully, I think the producers made the right choice on Ryleigh where they failed on several other artists later on in the night, because Ryleigh's take on "drivers' license" fit her vocal elegance to a T. The song gave her enough room to inject genuine emotion and heart into her performance, and the moments of airy falsetto and head voice were delivered with near-perfect accuracy (minus a crack during the bridge leading into a brief wobble in her voice, one from which she recovered from). Best of all, "drivers' license" had enough force to it where it felt like it had pacing and energy, but not enough where Ryleigh fell behind (a la "Use Somebody"). This was the performance Ryleigh both wanted and needed... and it might be enough for her to become a serious dark horse.
 
Zania Alaké • Ariana Grande's "Dangerous Woman" • Grade: what the freak, TPTB? (Translation: C-)
Oy vey, guys. What on Earth happened? Not to Zania, but to John and the producers? How stupid do you have to be to hand the most vocally proficient artist on your team a song that fits her stylings about as well as my hulking, straggly figure fits into a pair of skinny jeans. Zania is a performer that instills fire into every performance–not that we needed reminding after last week's revelation to the tune of Gladys Knight. Tonight, though, Zania's performance barely gave us a spark. Not for a lack of trying from the singer herself–she did her absolute best to drive the song home and perform the hell out of it. And her performance, visually, was convincing–but the cavalcade of wince-worthy notes, unperfected runs, and moments where her flat vocal faded into the noise overpowered her. Jesus, what is it with all of my favorites dropping the ball tonight? And who in God's name thought the sweet, soulful Zania matched nicely with the youthful electricity of a Grande song? Did her and Gihanna accidentally get song-swapped or something?
 
Pia Renee • Jazmine Sullivan's "Need U Bad" • Grade: B-
After the inexplicable tragedy of Zania's performance, I went into Pia's number with my fingers crossed: she was yet another artist I hadn't quite ~gotten~ until her impeccable Knockout performance. Thankfully, I reckon Pia's performance was definitely more than a few steps above Zania's vocally, although, like Zania, she didn't quite recapture the magic of her previous outing. If anything's to blame, it's the departure from the genre that did her all of the favors; R&B-reggae is more in her wheelhouse, sure, but this song deprived her of a real "moment", I worry. I still found myself pleased–and, in the case of the run that capped her performance off, quite impressed–by her performance as a whole, but the silky slyness of Sullivan's lyric was lost with some audible strain and a clear mismatch in singer volume to sound mixing. Again, I quite like actually hearing my performers in this show about music! All that said, the coaches' feedback she received, coupled with her teammate's missteps the performance before, makes me think she might not wholly be in danger. 
 
Victor Solomon • Stevie Wonder's "I Wish" • Grade: B+
At the end of Victor's gritty, groovy take on Stevie Wonder's funkalicious single (did i really just call it "funkalicious"? jesus.) left me with one thought: "Dayum!". This was immediately followed by another: "I sure wish I could hear him over the band." JESUS, THE VOICE! Was sound mixing really that hard for y'all tonight? Because I would've absolutely killed to experience a little more of the fervor Solomon delivered tonight. Victor's performance wasn't vocally perfect, but, with that kind of fierceness and entertainment value, it didn't need to be. Best of all, through all of the dancing and vibing he delivered, while at times raspy and a little unintelligible, still most (if not all) of the marks technically. The guy knows his wheelhouse, and he knows how to perform, that's for sure. A well-earned four man standing ovation, in my opinion. 
 
TEAM NICK
Dana Monique • En Vogue's "Free Your Mind" • Grade: A
And I thought Victor's performance was worth a "dayum!"! If that's the metric, Dana's absolute showstopper left me less like "Dayum!" and more like "Sweet lord,  I just got hit by a freight train and I absolutely mean that in the nicest way possible." Her rendition of the En Vogue classic was the complete package; fiery, fierce, reaching for just about every star in the sky possible and not leaving one unturned. She didn't leave a single piece behind after she finished, absolutely devouring every note, every run, every little moment for herself. And, by the end, I had to wonder: how on Earth does someone perform at this level of professionalism and ferocity without getting tired? One thing was for sure; that was one hell of a performance. And, I hope, that was the moment she needed to propel herself to the status of a genuine frontrunner she absolutely deserves.
 
Andrew Marshall • Corinne Bailey Rae's "Put Your Records On" • Grade: D+
As I knead my forehead with two fingers and rest my head in the palm of my free hand against my desk, I try and consider what was mixed into Mark Burnett's drink that made him and his team think that the electronic snoozefest that was Ritt Momney's cover of Rae's summer-soft feel-good tune would give rocker Andrew a performance that would rock America's cradle. The end result of this beautiful disaster of a song choice... well, actually, I'd hesitate to call it a disaster, per se. Marshall made the most of it, bringing as much chill and range as he physically could to the song. Unfortunately, there was no ignoring the one-note nature of the song, the sheer absence of any hook or moment, the notes unhit and the arrangement unrealized, and the awkward shuffling and strutting Andrew demonstrated in an ill-advised attempt at making him seem like a low-key indie-type artist. Consider me utterly unconvinced. All-around uncomfortable. 
 
José Figueroa Jr. • Bruno Mars' "Talking To The Moon" • Grade: B-
After delivering a performance that made me desperately crave a drink, I looked forward to whatever José was offering, hoping it would be as sweet as the saccharine vocals he delivered earlier this season. To my misfortune, however, this felt less like a Shirley Temple and more like a bottle cap full of mouthwash. José's assignment of this early Bruno Mars hit wasn't as evident of a mismatch between song and singer as a few others tonight, but José made it very clear through his middling passion that it was a song unwanted by him nonetheless. Aside from, yet again, the abysmal sound mix, there were sparks of polish in Figueroa's performance–a few notes and runs really hit the mark. It's a real shame that the performance was offset by pitch problems and perhaps the worst case of being unable to hear the poor guy anyone had all night. I'm telling y'all right now, José absolutely deserved better... and we know he can do better, at that. I can only hope tonight's performance was enough to at least send him to a chance at the Save.
 
Devan Blake Jones • The Backstreet Boys' "Shape Of My Heart" • Grade: C
Let me tell y'all, I think it's been a long time since a Voice result has garnered such a glorious reactionary wheeze from me, but the absolute out-of-left-field-ness of Devan's advancement (over the more marketable Carolina or the generally more memorable Savanna, unfortunately) was such a "what the freak" for me that I had to laugh. If only his performance wasn't such a muddled, generally forgettable snoozefest. Like, listen, I like Devan; guy's got a weapon in the form of his head voice. Just doesn't seem like he knows how to use it to its full potential. I gotta say, it's not a good sign that the few moments I remember from a performance are the ones that weren't great–when the falsetto high note nearing a screech is more memorable than the good moments, you're in trouble, I fear. Not a great moment for Team Nick or  the concept of the Four-Way Knockout.
 
Rachel Mac • Kacey Musgraves' "Rainbow" • Grade: B
Three performances ranging from middling to painful later, Rachel's youthful imperfections and intonations felt like the eye of the storm for me; somehow, this girl who I haven't loved throughout the competition was practically a breath of fresh air, to the point where I almost overranked the hell out of her pleasing, pleading Kacey Musgraves cover. Upon a second listen, Rachel's inexperience showed a little more, manifesting in cracks and sparks of breathlessness. Rachel's not an artist who demands perfection, however; it's the delicate artfulness of her vocal, the dainty air embedded in her musical storytelling that drives it, and, if that's the qualification we're going off of, then this was Rachel in her element. A shaky final verse and a few breaks in her earnestness aside, Rachel sang with sincerity, which bordered on beauty in her best moments tonight. Far from perfect, but absolutely worthy of the Semifinals, in my opinion.
 
TEAM BLAKE
Jordan Matthew Young • Fleetwood Mac's "Gold Dust Woman" • Grade: B+
I'll be honest; for all of the performers that really "clicked" for me during this season's sublime two weeks of Knockouts, Jordan is one of the few that didn't quite strike my fancy. Not that I dislike or even don't care for him, but his gravelly musicianship hadn't really struck a chord with me just yet. After tonight, though? With all of the smoky electricity he delivered, that was a practically perfect strum. This was a perfect song for Jordan to shine with, and he took full advantage of Fleetwood's ode to the devil's powder gave him the opportunity to sing like a man half-possessed. That intensity backfired for only a moment near the end when he lost a bit of that control driving him, but the stumble was a momentary blemish in an otherwise rock-solid shred of excellence. I can only wonder how on fire Jordan can get from here.
 
Anna Grace • Passenger's "Let Her Go" • Grade: A-
Jeez, Anna's arc throughout this season, for me, has been a nearly uphill slope; going from "four chairs? Really?" to "rivaling Corey for the most emotionally heartbreaking performer left in the competition" in the span of four performances. "Let Her Go" was understated, graceful, nearly the perfect mix of Ryleigh's dainty elegance and Rachel's earnest storytelling. The result? A ballad imbued with experience and emotionality. Although I worry the lack of much buildup throughout the song may have bored a few viewers, I found myself completely enraptured; Anna's instrument goes far beyond just her vocal ability, and that's been made no clearer at any other point as it was tonight.
 
Pete Mroz • Pat Benatar's "We Belong" • Grade: B
Ohhhh, Pete, Pete, Pete. How desperately I've wanted to love you all season. I can't fully express just how much I want to love Pete as much as Blake does, but the poor guy just straight up hasn't been given a chance to really shine. And Pete on Pat Benatar sounded like it'd go about as well as Pete on Lewis Capaldi did before he, well, won his Knockout. As a whole, "We Belong" went along about as well as a small bowl of vanilla ice cream; tasty, for sure, and definitely worth the time and taste buds, but, without any toppings, the experience feels sorely incomplete. Pete has been desperately lacking spice throughout his run own the show, and, as great of a vocalist he is, I worry the absence of flavor compared to his teammates might be his undoing. Still, if this happens to be his final performance, I at least can't say he's had a bad run on the show. I just wish he had one I would remember more distinctly.
 
Cam Anthony • Hozier's "Take Me To Church" • Grade: A
With so many of my favorites dropping the ball tonight, I awaited Cam's vocal with more bated breath than I've waited for a performance on The Voice for a good minute. Was the wait 
worth it, a la Team Blake's could-be frontrunner at this point in the competition last season? Unlike the Minivan's favorite trio, Cam ended the night in perfect harmony with himself, absolutely bringing the electricity a performer needs to really shine when singing live. I couldn't name a single point in the performance where I wasn't in complete awe of the guy; it was just. That. Good. So on-the-mark, so smooth, so much range and sincerity, so much belief in the vocal, so much passion, so much showmanship! How is it possible for someone to deliver four performances, all completely different from each-other in genre and tone, and all so perfect? I'm calling it now, y'all–Cam's gotta mess up bad to not win himself the crown this season. Now, quote me on that so I can look like a jackass when he gets 3rd in a few weeks.
 
FINAL PERSONAL RANKINGS
1. Dana Monique
2. Cam Anthony
3. Ryleigh Modig
4. Anna Grace
5. Corey Ward
6. Kenzie Wheeler
7. Victor Solomon
8. Jordan Matthew Young
9. Rachel Mac
10. Pete Mroz
11. José Figueroa Jr.
12. Gihanna Zoë
13. Pia Renee
14. Zae Romeo
15. Devan Blake Jones
16. Zania Alaké
17. Andrew Marshall
 
Predicted Top 9: Corey Ward, Kenzie Wheeler, Ryleigh Modig, Victor Solomon, Rachel Mac, Dana Monique, Cam Anthony, Jordan Matthew Young, Anna Grace
Edited by peachfuz
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Loved reading through this, it was entertaining, informative, and generally made a lot of sense. Though my rankings differed from yours, your rationale very clearly explained why you rated people how you rated them. The writing style has a touch that is very Charlie Mason (in a good way!), but unlike Charlie Mason, your rankings actually make sense :ph34rwave:

 

Thank you for posting! I look forward to seeing what you post for the IS / next week! 🙂

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The only disagreement I have is with Cam. I wasn't in awe of him as much as you were, I thought this was clearly his weakest performance. 

 

Otherwise, agree with everything you said, even if some of my grading and rankings would differ.

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6 hours ago, peachfuz said:

Fuz Reviews Season 20: A Pretentious The Voice Anthology

The Playoffs: Pity for Pity's Sake

•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•☾☼☽•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:

TEAM KELLY

Corey Ward • Lewis Capaldi’s “Bruises” • Grade: B+

With Capaldi’s lion’s roar of a ballad handed to the most emotionally potent voice left in the competition, I went into this opening performance with two expectations; that it would take a mountain-moving vocal to top his intimate “Already Gone” a few weeks ago, and that Corey’s voice was big enough to handle a song of this size. Sure enough, Corey took the song and just nearly owned it, emoting with 100% of his being while rising from a tremulous opening to the howl of the chorus. As someone who’s adored the returnee since the premiere, I can say with full confidence that, vocally, this was far from Corey’s finest moment–the first chorus teetered on the edge of yelly, and he seemed so overcome by the bridge that he straight up lost control of his falsetto. Thankfully, Corey acquitted himself, and the final declaration of the song was done with control and absolute fervor. It was far from perfect, but this was a performance that earned him a spot in the Top 9 next week.
 
Gihanna Zoë • Lady Gaga's “Always Remember Us This Way” • Grade: B-
I came into this performance with far more optimism than I expected I would have when I first heard Gihanna; I wasn't convinced on her vocal ability until her stunning rendition of "Glitter in the Air" back in the Knockouts. That said, A Star Is Born's swan song seemed to be a size or two too big for Gihanna's gentle vocal stylings; this seemed more like a job for Team Legend's Zania, no? On stage, Gihanna started with such delicacy that it felt like she was just barely grazing the lyric. As the song grew bigger, Gihanna did as well... although not exactly in conjunction with the song itself. Her vocal was strong, but, as a whole, the song demands a lot of maturity and bombast, and Gihanna, as great a vocalist she is, doesn't fill the space that Always Remember requires for someone to shine. Not to say it was a bad vocal–aside from a few hinky notes and what seemed to be a general audio issue, it was certainly passable. I just wonder if passable is enough at this point in the competition–and on a team as strong like this.
 
Zae Romeo • Miley Cyrus' "When I Look At You" • Grade: C
Listen, I'm not gonna pretend that Zae hasn't been one of my favorites all season–for good reason, too, considering I think his track record this season has been about as spotless as Team Blake's Cam Anthony. As such, you could imagine how my expectations crumbled before my eyes when Zae took to the live stage and his voice, once fluid as a glass of water, sounded about as pleasant to the ears as a rock inside of a blender. So much rasp was driven into his Miley Cyrus cover that, to the ear, he was nearly unrecognizable... and I'm afraid that's not a good thing. Zae's vocal was rough tonight; although his opening verses showed promise, he seemed to generally struggle with his range more than he has all season, and the song seemed overwrought, almost unpleasant at times. Wasn't this the guy who pretty much reinvented "Electric Love" last we see him? Love the guy to death, but he's in trouble tonight, I worry.
 
Kenzie Wheeler • Brooks and Dunn's "Red Dirt Road" • Grade: A-
As someone who's never really clicked with country artists in the first place, Kenzie's performance tonight made me wonder if it was the genre that I didn't like, or the lack of impressiveness exhibited by his predecessors, because damn! The Floridan injected so much wistful storytelling into his homage to Brooks and Dunn, and his vocal was nothing but resonant. If I have a single gripe with Wheeler, it's his presentation as a performer; great as he is as a vocalist, he looks about as excited to be onstage as a teenager earning money during his summer afternoons as a Chuck E. Cheese mascot boy. Love the guy's vocals, but I'd love to love watching him just as much. If he can address the showmanship, however? He'd be a legitimate–and absolutely deserving–candidate for Carter Rubin's crown.
(That said, would love for the Voice team to get their shit together and tighten up the sound mix; Kenzie was one of several vocalists who were affected for the worse by it. Isn't the point that we're supposed to, I dunno, hear them?)
 
TEAM LEGEND
Ryleigh Modig • Olivia Rodrigo's "drivers' license" • Grade: A-
Ryleigh's musical stylings are intricate, fluttery, and sweet as candy on the best songs... but her Knockout was a strong indication of her need for the best songs in order for her to truly shine. Thankfully, I think the producers made the right choice on Ryleigh where they failed on several other artists later on in the night, because Ryleigh's take on "drivers' license" fit her vocal elegance to a T. The song gave her enough room to inject genuine emotion and heart into her performance, and the moments of airy falsetto and head voice were delivered with near-perfect accuracy (minus a crack during the bridge leading into a brief wobble in her voice, one from which she recovered from). Best of all, "drivers' license" had enough force to it where it felt like it had pacing and energy, but not enough where Ryleigh fell behind (a la "Use Somebody"). This was the performance Ryleigh both wanted and needed... and it might be enough for her to become a serious dark horse.
 
Zania Alaké • Ariana Grande's "Dangerous Woman" • Grade: what the freak, TPTB? (Translation: C-)
Oy vey, guys. What on Earth happened? Not to Zania, but to John and the producers? How stupid do you have to be to hand the most vocally proficient artist on your team a song that fits her stylings about as well as my hulking, straggly figure fits into a pair of skinny jeans. Zania is a performer that instills fire into every performance–not that we needed reminding after last week's revelation to the tune of Gladys Knight. Tonight, though, Zania's performance barely gave us a spark. Not for a lack of trying from the singer herself–she did her absolute best to drive the song home and perform the hell out of it. And her performance, visually, was convincing–but the cavalcade of wince-worthy notes, unperfected runs, and moments where her flat vocal faded into the noise overpowered her. Jesus, what is it with all of my favorites dropping the ball tonight? And who in God's name thought the sweet, soulful Zania matched nicely with the youthful electricity of a Grande song? Did her and Gihanna accidentally get song-swapped or something?
 
Pia Renee • Jazmine Sullivan's "Need U Bad" • Grade: B-
After the inexplicable tragedy of Zania's performance, I went into Pia's number with my fingers crossed: she was yet another artist I hadn't quite ~gotten~ until her impeccable Knockout performance. Thankfully, I reckon Pia's performance was definitely more than a few steps above Zania's vocally, although, like Zania, she didn't quite recapture the magic of her previous outing. If anything's to blame, it's the departure from the genre that did her all of the favors; R&B-reggae is more in her wheelhouse, sure, but this song deprived her of a real "moment", I worry. I still found myself pleased–and, in the case of the run that capped her performance off, quite impressed–by her performance as a whole, but the silky slyness of Sullivan's lyric was lost with some audible strain and a clear mismatch in singer volume to sound mixing. Again, I quite like actually hearing my performers in this show about music! All that said, the coaches' feedback she received, coupled with her teammate's missteps the performance before, makes me think she might not wholly be in danger. 
 
Victor Solomon • Stevie Wonder's "I Wish" • Grade: B+
At the end of Victor's gritty, groovy take on Stevie Wonder's funkalicious single (did i really just call it "funkalicious"? jesus.) left me with one thought: "Dayum!". This was immediately followed by another: "I sure wish I could hear him over the band." JESUS, THE VOICE! Was sound mixing really that hard for y'all tonight? Because I would've absolutely killed to experience a little more of the fervor Solomon delivered tonight. Victor's performance wasn't vocally perfect, but, with that kind of fierceness and entertainment value, it didn't need to be. Best of all, through all of the dancing and vibing he delivered, while at times raspy and a little unintelligible, still most (if not all) of the marks technically. The guy knows his wheelhouse, and he knows how to perform, that's for sure. A well-earned four man standing ovation, in my opinion. 
 
TEAM NICK
Dana Monique • En Vogue's "Free My Mind" • Grade: A
And I thought Victor's performance was worth a "dayum!"! If that's the metric, Dana's absolute showstopper left me less like "Dayum!" and more like "Sweet lord,  I just got hit by a freight train and I absolutely mean that in the nicest way possible." Her rendition of the En Vogue classic was the complete package; fiery, fierce, reaching for just about every star in the sky possible and not leaving one unturned. She didn't leave a single piece behind after she finished, absolutely devouring every note, every run, every little moment for herself. And, by the end, I had to wonder: how on Earth does someone perform at this level of professionalism and ferocity without getting tired? One thing was for sure; that was one hell of a performance. And, I hope, that was the moment she needed to propel herself to the status of a genuine frontrunner she absolutely deserves.
 
Andrew Marshall • Corinne Bailey Rae's "Put Your Records On" • Grade: D+
As I knead my forehead with two fingers and rest my head in the palm of my free hand against my desk, I try and consider what was mixed into Mark Burnett's drink that made him and his team think that the electronic snoozefest that was Ritt Momney's cover of Rae's summer-soft feel-good tune would give rocker Andrew a performance that would rock America's cradle. The end result of this beautiful disaster of a song choice... well, actually, I'd hesitate to call it a disaster, per se. Marshall made the most of it, bringing as much chill and range as he physically could to the song. Unfortunately, there was no ignoring the one-note nature of the song, the sheer absence of any hook or moment, the notes unhit and the arrangement unrealized, and the awkward shuffling and strutting Andrew demonstrated in an ill-advised attempt at making him seem like a low-key indie-type artist. Consider me utterly unconvinced. All-around uncomfortable. 
 
José Figueroa Jr. • Bruno Mars' "Talking To The Moon" • Grade: B-
After delivering a performance that made me desperately crave a drink, I looked forward to whatever José was offering, hoping it would be as sweet as the saccharine vocals he delivered earlier this season. To my misfortune, however, this felt less like a Shirley Temple and more like a bottle cap full of mouthwash. José's assignment of this early Bruno Mars hit wasn't as evident of a mismatch between song and singer as a few others tonight, but José made it very clear through his middling passion that it was a song unwanted by him nonetheless. Aside from, yet again, the abysmal sound mix, there were sparks of polish in Figueroa's performance–a few notes and runs really hit the mark. It's a real shame that the performance was offset by pitch problems and perhaps the worst case of being unable to hear the poor guy anyone had all night. I'm telling y'all right now, José absolutely deserved better... and we know he can do better, at that. I can only hope tonight's performance was enough to at least send him to a chance at the Save.
 
Devan Blake Jones • The Backstreet Boys' "Shape Of My Heart" • Grade: C
Let me tell y'all, I think it's been a long time since a Voice result has garnered such a glorious reactionary wheeze from me, but the absolute out-of-left-field-ness of Devan's advancement (over the more marketable Carolina or the generally more memorable Savanna, unfortunately) was such a "what the freak" for me that I had to laugh. If only his performance wasn't such a muddled, generally forgettable snoozefest. Like, listen, I like Devan; guy's got a weapon in the form of his head voice. Just doesn't seem like he knows how to use it to its full potential. I gotta say, it's not a good sign that the few moments I remember from a performance are the ones that weren't great–when the falsetto high note nearing a screech is more memorable than the good moments, you're in trouble, I fear. Not a great moment for Team Nick or  the concept of the Four-Way Knockout.
 
Rachel Mac • Kacey Musgraves' "Rainbow" • Grade: B
Three performances ranging from middling to painful later, Rachel's youthful imperfections and intonations felt like the eye of the storm for me; somehow, this girl who I haven't loved throughout the competition was practically a breath of fresh air, to the point where I almost overranked the hell out of her pleasing, pleading Kacey Musgraves cover. Upon a second listen, Rachel's inexperience showed a little more, manifesting in cracks and sparks of breathlessness. Rachel's not an artist who demands perfection, however; it's the delicate artfulness of her vocal, the dainty air embedded in her musical storytelling that drives it, and, if that's the qualification we're going off of, then this was Rachel in her element. A shaky final verse and a few breaks in her earnestness aside, Rachel sang with sincerity, which bordered on beauty in her best moments tonight. Far from perfect, but absolutely worthy of the Semifinals, in my opinion.
 
TEAM KELLY
Jordan Matthew Young • Fleetwood Mac's "Gold Dust Woman" • Grade: B+
I'll be honest; for all of the performers that really "clicked" for me during this season's sublime two weeks of Knockouts, Jordan is one of the few that didn't quite strike my fancy. Not that I dislike or even don't care for him, but his gravelly musicianship hadn't really struck a chord with me just yet. After tonight, though? With all of the smoky electricity he delivered, that was a practically perfect strum. This was a perfect song for Jordan to shine with, and he took full advantage of Fleetwood's ode to the devil's powder gave him the opportunity to sing like a man half-possessed. That intensity backfired for only a moment near the end when he lost a bit of that control driving him, but the stumble was a momentary blemish in an otherwise rock-solid shred of excellence. I can only wonder how on fire Jordan can get from here.
 
Anna Grace • Passenger's "Let Her Go" • Grade: A-
Jeez, Anna's arc throughout this season, for me, has been a nearly uphill slope; going from "four chairs? Really?" to "rivaling Corey for the most emotionally heartbreaking performer left in the competition" in the span of four performances. "Let Her Go" was understated, graceful, nearly the perfect mix of Ryleigh's dainty elegance and Rachel's earnest storytelling. The result? A ballad imbued with experience and emotionality. Although I worry the lack of much buildup throughout the song may have bored a few viewers, I found myself completely enraptured; Anna's instrument goes far beyond just her vocal ability, and that's been made no clearer at any other point as it was tonight.
 
Pete Mroz • Pat Benatar's "We Belong" • Grade: B
Ohhhh, Pete, Pete, Pete. How desperately I've wanted to love you all season. I can't fully express just how much I want to love Pete as much as Blake does, but the poor guy just straight up hasn't been given a chance to really shine. And Pete on Pat Benatar sounded like it'd go about as well as Pete on Lewis Capaldi did before he, well, won his Knockout. As a whole, "We Belong" went along about as well as a small bowl of vanilla ice cream; tasty, for sure, and definitely worth the time and taste buds, but, without toppings, the experience felt sorely incomplete. Pete has been desperately lacking spice throughout his run own the show, and, as great of a vocalist he is, I worry the absence of flavor compared to his teammates might be his undoing. Still, if this happens to be his final performance, I at least can't say he's had a bad run on the show. I just wish he had one I would remember more distinctly.
 
Cam Anthony • Hozier's "Take Me To Church" • Grade: A
With so many of my favorites dropping the ball tonight, I awaited Cam's vocal with more bated breath than I've waited for a performance on The Voice for a good minute. Was the wait 
worth it, a la Team Blake's could-be frontrunner at this point in the competition last season? Unlike the Minivan's favorite trio, Cam ended the night in perfect harmony with himself, absolutely bringing the electricity a performer needs to really shine when singing live. I couldn't name a single point in the performance where I wasn't in complete awe of the guy; it was just. That. Good. So on-the-mark, so smooth, so much range and sincerity, so much belief in the vocal, so much passion, so much showmanship! How is it possible for someone to deliver four performances, all completely different from each-other in genre and tone, and all so perfect? I'm calling it now, y'all–Cam's gotta mess up bad to not win himself the crown this season. Now, quote me on that so I can look like a jackass when he gets 3rd in a few weeks.
 
FINAL PERSONAL RANKINGS
1. Cam Anthony
2. Dana Monique
3. Ryleigh Modig
4. Anna Grace
5. Corey Ward
6. Kenzie Wheeler
7. Victor Solomon
8. Jordan Matthew Young
9. Rachel Mac
10. Pete Mroz
11. José Figueroa Jr.
12. Gihanna Zoë
13. Pia Renee
14. Zae Romeo
15. Devan Blake Jones
16. Zania Alaké
17. Andrew Marshall
 
Predicted Top 9: Corey Ward, Kenzie Wheeler, Ryleigh Modig, Victor Solomon, Rachel Mac, Dana Monique, Cam Anthony, Jordan Matthew Young, Anna Grace

Love your reviews! I did want to mention tho you got Team Kelly on there twice I think you forgot to put Team Blake instead of you wanna edit the fix. But other than that spot on on everything especially that vanilla ice cream analogy on Pete lol as a Petefan that’s exactly how I felt I wanted him to do something bold and strong like Layla or pretty much anything else than Pat Benatar lol 

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7 hours ago, peachfuz said:

Fuz Reviews Season 20: A Pretentious The Voice Anthology

The Playoffs: Pity for Pity's Sake

•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•☾☼☽•:•.•:•.•:•:•:•:•:•:•:

TEAM KELLY

Corey Ward • Lewis Capaldi’s “Bruises” • Grade: B+

With Capaldi’s lion’s roar of a ballad handed to the most emotionally potent voice left in the competition, I went into this opening performance with two expectations; that it would take a mountain-moving vocal to top his intimate “Already Gone” a few weeks ago, and that Corey’s voice was big enough to handle a song of this size. Sure enough, Corey took the song and just nearly owned it, emoting with 100% of his being while rising from a tremulous opening to the howl of the chorus. As someone who’s adored the returnee since the premiere, I can say with full confidence that, vocally, this was far from Corey’s finest moment–the first chorus teetered on the edge of yelly, and he seemed so overcome by the bridge that he straight up lost control of his falsetto. Thankfully, Corey acquitted himself, and the final declaration of the song was done with control and absolute fervor. It was far from perfect, but this was a performance that earned him a spot in the Top 9 next week.
 
Gihanna Zoë • Lady Gaga's “Always Remember Us This Way” • Grade: B-
I came into this performance with far more optimism than I expected I would have when I first heard Gihanna; I wasn't convinced on her vocal ability until her stunning rendition of "Glitter in the Air" back in the Knockouts. That said, A Star Is Born's swan song seemed to be a size or two too big for Gihanna's gentle vocal stylings; this seemed more like a job for Team Legend's Zania, no? On stage, Gihanna started with such delicacy that it felt like she was just barely grazing the lyric. As the song grew bigger, Gihanna did as well... although not exactly in conjunction with the song itself. Her vocal was strong, but, as a whole, the song demands a lot of maturity and bombast, and Gihanna, as great a vocalist she is, doesn't fill the space that Always Remember requires for someone to shine. Not to say it was a bad vocal–aside from a few hinky notes and what seemed to be a general audio issue, it was certainly passable. I just wonder if passable is enough at this point in the competition–and on a team as strong like this.
 
Zae Romeo • Miley Cyrus' "When I Look At You" • Grade: C
Listen, I'm not gonna pretend that Zae hasn't been one of my favorites all season–for good reason, too, considering I think his track record this season has been about as spotless as Team Blake's Cam Anthony. As such, you could imagine how my expectations crumbled before my eyes when Zae took to the live stage and his voice, once fluid as a glass of water, sounded about as pleasant to the ears as a rock inside of a blender. So much rasp was driven into his Miley Cyrus cover that, to the ear, he was nearly unrecognizable... and I'm afraid that's not a good thing. Zae's vocal was rough tonight; although his opening verses showed promise, he seemed to generally struggle with his range more than he has all season, and the song seemed overwrought, almost unpleasant at times. Wasn't this the guy who pretty much reinvented "Electric Love" last we see him? Love the guy to death, but he's in trouble tonight, I worry.
 
Kenzie Wheeler • Brooks and Dunn's "Red Dirt Road" • Grade: A-
As someone who's never really clicked with country artists in the first place, Kenzie's performance tonight made me wonder if it was the genre that I didn't like, or the lack of impressiveness exhibited by his predecessors, because damn! The Floridan injected so much wistful storytelling into his homage to Brooks and Dunn, and his vocal was nothing but resonant. If I have a single gripe with Wheeler, it's his presentation as a performer; great as he is as a vocalist, he looks about as excited to be onstage as a teenager earning money during his summer afternoons as a Chuck E. Cheese mascot boy. Love the guy's vocals, but I'd love to love watching him just as much. If he can address the showmanship, however? He'd be a legitimate–and absolutely deserving–candidate for Carter Rubin's crown.
(That said, would love for the Voice team to get their shit together and tighten up the sound mix; Kenzie was one of several vocalists who were affected for the worse by it. Isn't the point that we're supposed to, I dunno, hear them?)
 
TEAM LEGEND
Ryleigh Modig • Olivia Rodrigo's "drivers' license" • Grade: A-
Ryleigh's musical stylings are intricate, fluttery, and sweet as candy on the best songs... but her Knockout was a strong indication of her need for the best songs in order for her to truly shine. Thankfully, I think the producers made the right choice on Ryleigh where they failed on several other artists later on in the night, because Ryleigh's take on "drivers' license" fit her vocal elegance to a T. The song gave her enough room to inject genuine emotion and heart into her performance, and the moments of airy falsetto and head voice were delivered with near-perfect accuracy (minus a crack during the bridge leading into a brief wobble in her voice, one from which she recovered from). Best of all, "drivers' license" had enough force to it where it felt like it had pacing and energy, but not enough where Ryleigh fell behind (a la "Use Somebody"). This was the performance Ryleigh both wanted and needed... and it might be enough for her to become a serious dark horse.
 
Zania Alaké • Ariana Grande's "Dangerous Woman" • Grade: what the freak, TPTB? (Translation: C-)
Oy vey, guys. What on Earth happened? Not to Zania, but to John and the producers? How stupid do you have to be to hand the most vocally proficient artist on your team a song that fits her stylings about as well as my hulking, straggly figure fits into a pair of skinny jeans. Zania is a performer that instills fire into every performance–not that we needed reminding after last week's revelation to the tune of Gladys Knight. Tonight, though, Zania's performance barely gave us a spark. Not for a lack of trying from the singer herself–she did her absolute best to drive the song home and perform the hell out of it. And her performance, visually, was convincing–but the cavalcade of wince-worthy notes, unperfected runs, and moments where her flat vocal faded into the noise overpowered her. Jesus, what is it with all of my favorites dropping the ball tonight? And who in God's name thought the sweet, soulful Zania matched nicely with the youthful electricity of a Grande song? Did her and Gihanna accidentally get song-swapped or something?
 
Pia Renee • Jazmine Sullivan's "Need U Bad" • Grade: B-
After the inexplicable tragedy of Zania's performance, I went into Pia's number with my fingers crossed: she was yet another artist I hadn't quite ~gotten~ until her impeccable Knockout performance. Thankfully, I reckon Pia's performance was definitely more than a few steps above Zania's vocally, although, like Zania, she didn't quite recapture the magic of her previous outing. If anything's to blame, it's the departure from the genre that did her all of the favors; R&B-reggae is more in her wheelhouse, sure, but this song deprived her of a real "moment", I worry. I still found myself pleased–and, in the case of the run that capped her performance off, quite impressed–by her performance as a whole, but the silky slyness of Sullivan's lyric was lost with some audible strain and a clear mismatch in singer volume to sound mixing. Again, I quite like actually hearing my performers in this show about music! All that said, the coaches' feedback she received, coupled with her teammate's missteps the performance before, makes me think she might not wholly be in danger. 
 
Victor Solomon • Stevie Wonder's "I Wish" • Grade: B+
At the end of Victor's gritty, groovy take on Stevie Wonder's funkalicious single (did i really just call it "funkalicious"? jesus.) left me with one thought: "Dayum!". This was immediately followed by another: "I sure wish I could hear him over the band." JESUS, THE VOICE! Was sound mixing really that hard for y'all tonight? Because I would've absolutely killed to experience a little more of the fervor Solomon delivered tonight. Victor's performance wasn't vocally perfect, but, with that kind of fierceness and entertainment value, it didn't need to be. Best of all, through all of the dancing and vibing he delivered, while at times raspy and a little unintelligible, still most (if not all) of the marks technically. The guy knows his wheelhouse, and he knows how to perform, that's for sure. A well-earned four man standing ovation, in my opinion. 
 
TEAM NICK
Dana Monique • En Vogue's "Free My Mind" • Grade: A
And I thought Victor's performance was worth a "dayum!"! If that's the metric, Dana's absolute showstopper left me less like "Dayum!" and more like "Sweet lord,  I just got hit by a freight train and I absolutely mean that in the nicest way possible." Her rendition of the En Vogue classic was the complete package; fiery, fierce, reaching for just about every star in the sky possible and not leaving one unturned. She didn't leave a single piece behind after she finished, absolutely devouring every note, every run, every little moment for herself. And, by the end, I had to wonder: how on Earth does someone perform at this level of professionalism and ferocity without getting tired? One thing was for sure; that was one hell of a performance. And, I hope, that was the moment she needed to propel herself to the status of a genuine frontrunner she absolutely deserves.
 
Andrew Marshall • Corinne Bailey Rae's "Put Your Records On" • Grade: D+
As I knead my forehead with two fingers and rest my head in the palm of my free hand against my desk, I try and consider what was mixed into Mark Burnett's drink that made him and his team think that the electronic snoozefest that was Ritt Momney's cover of Rae's summer-soft feel-good tune would give rocker Andrew a performance that would rock America's cradle. The end result of this beautiful disaster of a song choice... well, actually, I'd hesitate to call it a disaster, per se. Marshall made the most of it, bringing as much chill and range as he physically could to the song. Unfortunately, there was no ignoring the one-note nature of the song, the sheer absence of any hook or moment, the notes unhit and the arrangement unrealized, and the awkward shuffling and strutting Andrew demonstrated in an ill-advised attempt at making him seem like a low-key indie-type artist. Consider me utterly unconvinced. All-around uncomfortable. 
 
José Figueroa Jr. • Bruno Mars' "Talking To The Moon" • Grade: B-
After delivering a performance that made me desperately crave a drink, I looked forward to whatever José was offering, hoping it would be as sweet as the saccharine vocals he delivered earlier this season. To my misfortune, however, this felt less like a Shirley Temple and more like a bottle cap full of mouthwash. José's assignment of this early Bruno Mars hit wasn't as evident of a mismatch between song and singer as a few others tonight, but José made it very clear through his middling passion that it was a song unwanted by him nonetheless. Aside from, yet again, the abysmal sound mix, there were sparks of polish in Figueroa's performance–a few notes and runs really hit the mark. It's a real shame that the performance was offset by pitch problems and perhaps the worst case of being unable to hear the poor guy anyone had all night. I'm telling y'all right now, José absolutely deserved better... and we know he can do better, at that. I can only hope tonight's performance was enough to at least send him to a chance at the Save.
 
Devan Blake Jones • The Backstreet Boys' "Shape Of My Heart" • Grade: C
Let me tell y'all, I think it's been a long time since a Voice result has garnered such a glorious reactionary wheeze from me, but the absolute out-of-left-field-ness of Devan's advancement (over the more marketable Carolina or the generally more memorable Savanna, unfortunately) was such a "what the freak" for me that I had to laugh. If only his performance wasn't such a muddled, generally forgettable snoozefest. Like, listen, I like Devan; guy's got a weapon in the form of his head voice. Just doesn't seem like he knows how to use it to its full potential. I gotta say, it's not a good sign that the few moments I remember from a performance are the ones that weren't great–when the falsetto high note nearing a screech is more memorable than the good moments, you're in trouble, I fear. Not a great moment for Team Nick or  the concept of the Four-Way Knockout.
 
Rachel Mac • Kacey Musgraves' "Rainbow" • Grade: B
Three performances ranging from middling to painful later, Rachel's youthful imperfections and intonations felt like the eye of the storm for me; somehow, this girl who I haven't loved throughout the competition was practically a breath of fresh air, to the point where I almost overranked the hell out of her pleasing, pleading Kacey Musgraves cover. Upon a second listen, Rachel's inexperience showed a little more, manifesting in cracks and sparks of breathlessness. Rachel's not an artist who demands perfection, however; it's the delicate artfulness of her vocal, the dainty air embedded in her musical storytelling that drives it, and, if that's the qualification we're going off of, then this was Rachel in her element. A shaky final verse and a few breaks in her earnestness aside, Rachel sang with sincerity, which bordered on beauty in her best moments tonight. Far from perfect, but absolutely worthy of the Semifinals, in my opinion.
 
TEAM KELLY
Jordan Matthew Young • Fleetwood Mac's "Gold Dust Woman" • Grade: B+
I'll be honest; for all of the performers that really "clicked" for me during this season's sublime two weeks of Knockouts, Jordan is one of the few that didn't quite strike my fancy. Not that I dislike or even don't care for him, but his gravelly musicianship hadn't really struck a chord with me just yet. After tonight, though? With all of the smoky electricity he delivered, that was a practically perfect strum. This was a perfect song for Jordan to shine with, and he took full advantage of Fleetwood's ode to the devil's powder gave him the opportunity to sing like a man half-possessed. That intensity backfired for only a moment near the end when he lost a bit of that control driving him, but the stumble was a momentary blemish in an otherwise rock-solid shred of excellence. I can only wonder how on fire Jordan can get from here.
 
Anna Grace • Passenger's "Let Her Go" • Grade: A-
Jeez, Anna's arc throughout this season, for me, has been a nearly uphill slope; going from "four chairs? Really?" to "rivaling Corey for the most emotionally heartbreaking performer left in the competition" in the span of four performances. "Let Her Go" was understated, graceful, nearly the perfect mix of Ryleigh's dainty elegance and Rachel's earnest storytelling. The result? A ballad imbued with experience and emotionality. Although I worry the lack of much buildup throughout the song may have bored a few viewers, I found myself completely enraptured; Anna's instrument goes far beyond just her vocal ability, and that's been made no clearer at any other point as it was tonight.
 
Pete Mroz • Pat Benatar's "We Belong" • Grade: B
Ohhhh, Pete, Pete, Pete. How desperately I've wanted to love you all season. I can't fully express just how much I want to love Pete as much as Blake does, but the poor guy just straight up hasn't been given a chance to really shine. And Pete on Pat Benatar sounded like it'd go about as well as Pete on Lewis Capaldi did before he, well, won his Knockout. As a whole, "We Belong" went along about as well as a small bowl of vanilla ice cream; tasty, for sure, and definitely worth the time and taste buds, but, without toppings, the experience felt sorely incomplete. Pete has been desperately lacking spice throughout his run own the show, and, as great of a vocalist he is, I worry the absence of flavor compared to his teammates might be his undoing. Still, if this happens to be his final performance, I at least can't say he's had a bad run on the show. I just wish he had one I would remember more distinctly.
 
Cam Anthony • Hozier's "Take Me To Church" • Grade: A
With so many of my favorites dropping the ball tonight, I awaited Cam's vocal with more bated breath than I've waited for a performance on The Voice for a good minute. Was the wait 
worth it, a la Team Blake's could-be frontrunner at this point in the competition last season? Unlike the Minivan's favorite trio, Cam ended the night in perfect harmony with himself, absolutely bringing the electricity a performer needs to really shine when singing live. I couldn't name a single point in the performance where I wasn't in complete awe of the guy; it was just. That. Good. So on-the-mark, so smooth, so much range and sincerity, so much belief in the vocal, so much passion, so much showmanship! How is it possible for someone to deliver four performances, all completely different from each-other in genre and tone, and all so perfect? I'm calling it now, y'all–Cam's gotta mess up bad to not win himself the crown this season. Now, quote me on that so I can look like a jackass when he gets 3rd in a few weeks.
 
FINAL PERSONAL RANKINGS
1. Cam Anthony
2. Dana Monique
3. Ryleigh Modig
4. Anna Grace
5. Corey Ward
6. Kenzie Wheeler
7. Victor Solomon
8. Jordan Matthew Young
9. Rachel Mac
10. Pete Mroz
11. José Figueroa Jr.
12. Gihanna Zoë
13. Pia Renee
14. Zae Romeo
15. Devan Blake Jones
16. Zania Alaké
17. Andrew Marshall
 
Predicted Top 9: Corey Ward, Kenzie Wheeler, Ryleigh Modig, Victor Solomon, Rachel Mac, Dana Monique, Cam Anthony, Jordan Matthew Young, Anna Grace

How come did Kelly had 8 artist on PO.

Jk edit that out @peachfuz Team Kelly -> Team Blake

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Good job tonight

 

I would have increased Gihanna’s grade and lowered Jose’s, but only by a bit (as I thought Gihanna was better than Jose. Also so I could separate Jose from Rachel. Regardless, he was definitely better than Devan and Andrew). This is very minor though, and they are also on different teams anyway. At least you justified your reasoning for these


I’m glad that Zae got a C instead of a B-, and Ryleigh didn’t get a B- (she was the best on Team Legend, and I would have switched their grades from Charlie, which you did)

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