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I can see the Trump supporters are as delusional as Trump here. Posting a bunch of fake conspiracy theories is pretty pathetic, but Trump knew he could manipulate his voters into this charade.  

I find it hilarious how Trumpsters (and Republicans in general) are just so used to cheating and bullying their way through life, that they simply can't fathom that 75 million Americans voted against

Me waiting for this groundbreaking evidence that has been posted about in this thread for well over a month that's going to win a court case and change everything.

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20 minutes ago, psterina said:

70,000 Ballots Found on farm in AZ. The amount of shenanigans, is really staggering. 

 

 

 

You don't even attempt to get your information from credible sources, do you? An electronically generated voice on an obscure youtube channel?

 

12 minutes ago, psterina said:

A friendly reminder ....

 

 

 

Giuliani is one Trump associate who will likely see much-deserved jail time (like Trump's already-dozens of associates who have). And he's a complete joke, I don't know why you'd expect anyone to take this seriously.

 

4 hours ago, psterina said:

 

 

Really? Cuz, the court cases start on Monday

...and 9 of them have been heard, and dismissed, or ruled against. So, again, you don't care what the courts say, since they've all said everything Trump has claimed is wrong or baseless speculation without any evidentiary support.

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10 hours ago, bills_guy said:

 

You don't even attempt to get your information from credible sources, do you? An electronically generated voice on an obscure youtube channel?

 

 

Giuliani is one Trump associate who will likely see much-deserved jail time (like Trump's already-dozens of associates who have). And he's a complete joke, I don't know why you'd expect anyone to take this seriously.

 

...and 9 of them have been heard, and dismissed, or ruled against. So, again, you don't care what the courts say, since they've all said everything Trump has claimed is wrong or baseless speculation without any evidentiary support.

 

Except for .... the courts, are taking this seriously. And, you will be SHOWN, how seriously.

 

Guilliani, happens, to be heading up Trumps legal team, so ..... there's that. So, he's not just talking, to talk. He is informing you, aand EVERYONE, as to what is legally going on.  Bring some proof of what you're saying, dude. The truth of the matter is ....  the constitution, does not give the media, the power, to call elections, so .... there's that. As far as sources go .... PU-LEEZ, your "news" sources, are bought & paid for, by pharmaceutical companies, and owned by 6 corporations.  It is corrupt, and I repeat ....  you are actually being shown, how much. Follow the money, honey  

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15 hours ago, psterina said:

During the primaries, I didn't want Biden, and I certainly, didn't want Kamala. They are corrupt, as is the media., who continues, to show their corruption, like today. Biden, has not won. The media, CANNOT call the presidency. It's not their place, to call it.

 

But did you have any issue with the media calling the presidency in 2016, 2012, 2008, 2004... 

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4 minutes ago, *Chris said:

 

But did you have any issue with the media calling the presidency in 2016, 2012, 2008, 2004... 

 

Yes. It's not the media's place. They LEGALLY, cannot call it. It doesn't hold water. That, isn't how it's done. I mean, they can call it, but ... again .... it doesn't hold water. It is far from done, and personally ....  in my opinion, it is interfering with an election.

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1 minute ago, psterina said:

 

Yes. It's not the media's place. They LEGALLY, cannot call it. It doesn't hold water. That, isn't how it's done. I mean, they can call it, but ... again .... it doesn't hold water. It is far from done, and personally ....  in my opinion, it is interfering with an election.

Okay. 

I personally have no problem, even when my preferred candidate didn't win especially on campaign that I put over 50+ hours of volunteering. 

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4 minutes ago, Nutterbutter said:

The media can call it, but only after a concession speech by either candidate. Trump has not conceded.

https://theconversation.com/who-formally-declares-the-winner-of-the-us-presidential-election-145212

 

Exactly. They cannot call it, before that.  And ...

 

Because there are SO MANY discrepancies, it is going to court (several states). So yeah, he's not going to concede/or be declared the winner, until the courts are done. A fair election, should be wanted by everyone. But, as we see ..... that is not the case 

 

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8 minutes ago, Nutterbutter said:

The media can call it, but only after a concession speech by either candidate. Trump has not conceded.

https://theconversation.com/who-formally-declares-the-winner-of-the-us-presidential-election-145212

ok if the courts come back and say not enough to overturn anything then wil you accpet it and will he actually conceede then. 

Edited by bswanson
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 I don’t think the challenges will be enough for Trump to retain the presidency, but I have zero issue with legal action, to help ensure shit like this is less likely to happen in the future. If this is accurate, they should go to prison. 
 

 

Edited by TeamAudra
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Associated Press logo

https://www.ap.org/en-us/topics/politics/elections/how-we-call-races

The process

In the 2020 U.S. general election, The Associated Press will declare winners in more than 7,000 races – starting with the White House and reaching down the ballot to every seat in every state legislature. This hallmark of AP’s Election Day news report is produced by a dedicated team of election analysts, researchers and race callers who make up our Decision Desk.

AP does not make projections or name apparent or likely winners. If our race callers cannot definitively say a candidate has won, we do not engage in speculation. AP did not call the closely contested race in 2000 between George W. Bush and Al Gore – we stood behind our assessment that the margin in Florida made it too close to call.

Only when AP is fully confident a race has been won – defined most simply as the moment a trailing candidate no longer has a path to victory – will we make a call. In the race for president in 2016, that moment came at 2:29 a.m. ET the day after Election Day. Our APNewsAlert put it simply: “WASHINGTON (AP) – Donald Trump elected president of the United States.”

AP’s race callers and Decision Desk are driven entirely by the facts. Race calls made by other organizations have no bearing on when AP declares a candidate the winner. Our decision team does not engage in debate with any campaign or candidate. Should a candidate declare victory – or offer a concession – before AP calls a race, we will cover newsworthy developments in our reporting.  In doing so, we will make clear that AP has not yet declared a winner and explain the reason why we believe the race is too early or too close to call.

 

AP will declare winners in 7,000 races in 2020

 

 

Races are called when a winner is clear

 

 
 

 

Q: Who calls races at AP?

A: AP’s race callers are staff who are deeply familiar with the states where they declare winners. Most have called races in a state for many years. Their work begins months before Election Day, as they study election rules and recount requirements and track changes and updates to election law. They work with AP’s political and government reporters to sharpen their understanding of campaigns and track coverage of races from AP member news organizations and customers.

They also review and rely on information from AP’s election research group. They know before polls close how each county and congressional district in their state has voted in past elections, the state’s past results for voting by mail and early in-person voting, and the state’s history of counting votes after Election Day.

Every election year, race callers also complete extensive training sessions designed to review and refresh the analytical skills required to make accurate decisions on election night.

Q: When does AP call a race?

A: AP race callers have a wide range of tools at their disposal to analyze the state of a race. They include AP’s vote count, which it has conducted in every U.S. presidential election since 1848. The Decision Desk also has access to data from AP VoteCast, our wide-ranging survey of the American electorate.

Race callers collaborate with analysts who focus on statewide races, such as those for U.S. Senate and governor, and elections for the U.S. House of Representatives. The editors at AP’s Decision Desk sign off on every race call for president, U.S. Senate and governor.

Together, they are looking at far more than just the overall vote totals. They study the incoming vote county by county. In states where the information is available, they look at the vote by type of ballot: cast in person on Election Day, or in advance by mail or in person. They are also in constant contact with AP’s vote count team, in search of the latest information about what’s been counted so far and how many ballots may still be left to count.

Much attention this year has focused on when ballots will be counted by election officials – before Election Day, on Election Day or on the days after. This is something AP’s Decision Desk has long factored into making a race call. In 2018, for example, Republican Martha McSally led in the race for U.S. Senate in Arizona on election night. AP waited to declare a winner because we expected Democrat Kyrsten Sinema would fare much better than McSally in late-arriving mail ballots that would be counted after Election Day. She did, and AP called Sinema the winner the following Monday.

All of this reporting and analysis is aimed at determining the answer to a single question: Can the trailing candidates catch the leader? Only when the answer is an unquestionable “no” is the race is ready to be called

Q: Will AP use exit polls to call races?

A: For many years, AP was part of the National Election Pool that conducted exit polls in general elections and during presidential primaries. AP left the NEP after the 2016 election, in part because we no longer believe interviewing voters at polling places on Election Day is the best methodology to survey an electorate that increasingly votes in advance.

In 2018, we debuted AP VoteCast. Working with NORC at the University of Chicago, AP developed a new approach to survey research designed specifically to account for the steady rise in votes cast before Election Day. In 2018, roughly 43% of voters cast their ballots before polls opened on Election Day. Due to the pandemic, it appears certain that more than half of voters will do so in 2020.

While we did not anticipate the pandemic when developing AP VoteCast, its methodology is well suited for this moment. Research from AP VoteCast will tell us how many people voted early, among other things, helping us understand the shape of the race. You can read more about its methodology and how we plan use results from the survey here.

Q: How can AP call a race as soon as polls close?

A: Not all races are closely contested. In some states, a party or candidate’s past history of consistent and convincing wins – by a wide margin – make a race eligible to be declared as soon as polls close. In these states, we use results from AP VoteCast to confirm a candidate has won.

To be sure, AP will not call the winner of a race before all the polls close in a jurisdiction. And we remain committed to using results from AP VoteCast with great care and caution, applying the same standard of absolute assurance to a race call made at poll close as we do all others.

Q: When is a race "too close to call"?

A: Beginning in 2019, AP’s Decision Desk started the practice of formally declaring some elections as “too close to call.” The vote tabulation in such a race has reached its primary conclusion – all outstanding ballots save provisional and late-arriving absentee ballots have been counted – without a clear winner.

AP may decide not to call a race if the margin between the top two candidates is less than 0.5 percentage points. On election night, AP may not call winners in races for U.S. House if the margin is less than 1,000 votes and winners in races for state legislature if the margin is less than 2 percentage points or 100 votes.

If an election has significant news value, such as one that would determine party control of a state legislature, AP will closely review the race to determine whether an exception to these standards may be made.

In races where tabulation remains active and ongoing, AP will not declare a race “too close to call” unless it is clear it will proceed to or be subject to a recount. That includes races where completing the vote count may take several days. In such cases, AP will describe a race in its news report as “too early to call” – an informal designation that indicates we do not have enough data to make a race call.

Q: How does AP handle recounts?

A: AP does not declare a winner of an election that will be — or is likely to become — subject to a mandatory recount.

In several states, recounts are mandated if the margin between the top two candidates falls inside a set range established by law. AP will not call a race if the margin is within such a mandatory recount range — or if it could fall into that range as final votes are counted.

In some states, recounts may be requested if the margin falls inside of a set range. In others, candidates can request a recount regardless of the margin between the top two candidates. In these states, AP will not call a race if the margin between the top two candidates is 0.5 percentage points or less, or if the margin could fall inside that range once all ballots cast are counted.

AP may call the race if the trailing candidate confirms they will not seek a recount or if the candidate publicly concedes the election.

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USAGov Logo

https://www.usa.gov/election

 

  • The Electors

    Each state gets as many electors as it has members of Congress (House and Senate). Including Washington, D.C.’s three electors, there are currently 538 electors in all. See the distribution of electors by state.

    Each state’s political parties choose their own slate of potential electors. Who is chosen to be an elector, how, and when varies by state.

  • How Does the Electoral College Process Work?

    After you cast your ballot for president, your vote goes to a statewide tally. In 48 states and Washington, D.C., the winner gets all the electoral votes for that state. Maine and Nebraska assign their electors using a proportional system.

    A candidate needs the vote of at least 270 electors—more than half of all electors—to win the presidential election.

    In most cases, a projected winner is announced on election night in November after you vote. But the actual Electoral College vote takes place in mid-December when the electors meet in their states. See the Electoral College timeline of events for the 2020 election.

    While the Constitution doesn’t require electors to follow their state's popular vote, many states' laws do. Though it's rare, electors have challenged those laws and voted for someone else. But in July 2020 the Supreme Court ruled (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) that those state laws are constitutional. Electors must follow their state's popular vote, if the state has passed such a law. 

  • Special Situations

    Winning the Popular Vote but Losing the Election

    It is possible to win the Electoral College but lose the popular vote.  This happened in 2016, in 2000, and three times in the 1800s.

    What Happens if No Candidate Wins the Majority of Electoral Votes?

    If no candidate receives the majority of electoral votes, the vote goes to the House of Representatives. House members choose the new president from among the top three candidates. The Senate elects the vice president from the remaining top two candidates.

    This has only happened once. In 1824, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams as president.

  • How to Change the Electoral College

    The Electoral College process is in the U.S. Constitution. It would take a constitutional amendment to change the process. For more information, contact your U.S. senator or your U.S. representative.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/02/us/politics/trump-people-vote-twice.html

Trump Encourages People in North Carolina to Vote Twice, Which Is Illegal

The president’s suggestion, which he framed as a way to test the security of elections systems, constituted the kind of voter fraud he has railed against.

  • Published Sept. 2, 2020

President Trump on Wednesday suggested that people in North Carolina stress-test the security of their elections systems by voting twice — an act that constitutes the kind of voter fraud the president has railed against.

 

Mr. Trump made the comment in a briefing with reporters, where he was asked about his faith in the state’s system for voting by mail, which is expected to be more expansive in the 2020 presidential election than in previous years because of concerns about the spread of the coronavirus.

 

Mr. Trump encouraged people to send in an absentee ballot and then go vote in person on Election Day.

...
 

“That’s the way it is,” he added. “And that’s what they should do.”

 

But Mr. Trump’s suggestion that people should vote twice is one he has discussed privately with aides in recent weeks amid concerns he is depressing turnout among his supporters by raising alarms about the security of mail-in voting.

 

Voting twice in the same election is illegal.

 

As the number of people planning to mail in their ballots has increased, Mr. Trump has repeatedly made false claims about widespread fraud in mail voting. With his advisers trying to tell him that he’s scaring his own supporters, including older voters, with his broad condemnations, he has sought to draw a distinction between universal mail voting and more limited absentee voting in which the person is away from home or has a disability.

 

But even as he has made such distinctions, he has continued to float wild theories about extensive voter fraud that are not backed up by evidence. He has repeatedly detailed far-fetched, seemingly manufactured stories about ballots being forged.

 

...

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13 minutes ago, bswanson said:

ok if the courts come back and say not enough to overturn anything then wil you accpet it and will he actually conceede then. 

I'm just along for the ride, like you. As far as I'm concerned, Trump was the better choice. My 401 says so. 

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9 minutes ago, FrogLenzen said:

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/02/us/politics/trump-people-vote-twice.html

Trump Encourages People in North Carolina to Vote Twice, Which Is Illegal

The president’s suggestion, which he framed as a way to test the security of elections systems, constituted the kind of voter fraud he has railed against.

  • Published Sept. 2, 2020

President Trump on Wednesday suggested that people in North Carolina stress-test the security of their elections systems by voting twice — an act that constitutes the kind of voter fraud the president has railed against.

 

Mr. Trump made the comment in a briefing with reporters, where he was asked about his faith in the state’s system for voting by mail, which is expected to be more expansive in the 2020 presidential election than in previous years because of concerns about the spread of the coronavirus.

 

Mr. Trump encouraged people to send in an absentee ballot and then go vote in person on Election Day.

...
 

“That’s the way it is,” he added. “And that’s what they should do.”

 

But Mr. Trump’s suggestion that people should vote twice is one he has discussed privately with aides in recent weeks amid concerns he is depressing turnout among his supporters by raising alarms about the security of mail-in voting.

 

Voting twice in the same election is illegal.

 

As the number of people planning to mail in their ballots has increased, Mr. Trump has repeatedly made false claims about widespread fraud in mail voting. With his advisers trying to tell him that he’s scaring his own supporters, including older voters, with his broad condemnations, he has sought to draw a distinction between universal mail voting and more limited absentee voting in which the person is away from home or has a disability.

 

But even as he has made such distinctions, he has continued to float wild theories about extensive voter fraud that are not backed up by evidence. He has repeatedly detailed far-fetched, seemingly manufactured stories about ballots being forged.

 

...

Fake news. Another "fine people" context twist.

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