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> RWG's Top 100 Albums of 2011
*Wallace
post Dec 31st 2011, 2:00 PM
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I feel like I've heard of Whitehorse but not too sure. Now I have heard City and the Colour and kind of like some of the songs you posted from them. tongue.gif Loving the write-ups still!


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RWG
post Jan 2nd 2012, 5:03 AM
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QUOTE(*Wallace @ Dec 31st 2011, 11:00 AM) *

I feel like I've heard of Whitehorse but not too sure. Now I have heard City and the Colour and kind of like some of the songs you posted from them. tongue.gif Loving the write-ups still!

Yeah, the middle portion has most of the least-well-know artists. It will get more recognizable towards the end.

I'll be posting in intervals of five now.

50. Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage 1982-2011
R.E.M.
Warner Bros. Records Inc.


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What can you say? Regardless of whether or not you were enamoured with the recently disbanded R.E.M. or annoyed by their popularity, what can you say for their longevity? For the fact they were a relatively modern band (both in sound and in chronology) that still manages to creep into conversations debating the best American rock band of all time? Or even for their hits on a microcosmic level? Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage, a catalog of the band’s finest songs, points out that the Athens, Georgia-based rock legends have reached a Beatles-like status in the songs that made them great: like with the Lennon-McCartney songbook, everyone has an R.E.M. song they like. Be it the uplifting ballad "Everybody Hurts," the dark and personal "Losing My Religion," the hard-rocking "The One I Love," the quirky "Man on the Moon," the fast-talking "It's the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)," the peaceful "Nightswimming," the signature breakthrough "Radio-Free Europe," or something a little more cache, this album shows that while being consistent and uncompromising, R.E.M. made something for everyone. Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage includes forty of the band’s best known songs—including work from the 2011 release Collapse into Now—and twelve live performance videos—a “must have” for any serious fans.

Recommended tracks: "Man on the Moon" "Nightswimming" "It's the End of the World As We Know It" "Losing My Religion" "Everybody Hurts" "The One I Love" "Radio-Free Europe"

49. Sound Kapital
Handsome Furs
Sub Pop Records


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Sound Kapital, the third album from electro-pop duo Dan Boeckner (formerly of Wolf Parade) and wife Alexei Perry, may be Handsome Furs' most defining one to date. With Wolf Parade formally declared dead earlier this year, Sound Kapital seems to make a point of cutting out elements from their earlier albums that could be described as crossover points with Wolf Parade. For example, the dark, Joy Division-esque punk rock elements heard in songs like "Evangeline," off of their 2009 release Face Control, seem largely extinguished on Sound Kapital (with exception to "Cheap Music"). In place is a consistently more synthy, glaring, '80s retro sound. "Repatriated"—personal, melancholic, and almost defeatist by lyric—is an uplifting and dance-inspiring centrepiece that wins over listeners with one of the best C-sections I’ve heard in ages ("I’ve seen the future and it’s coming in low, / I’ve seen the future, I will never be repatriated"). In fact, I’d’ call "Repatriated" one of my favourite songs of 2011. The sexy "What About Us?" and electric "Bury Me Standing" are other highlights. The band does a good job of capturing an authentic '80s mood without deliberately trying to sound like any one '80s band in particular (I’d argue parts of Face Control try too hard to sound like New Order in places and Joy Division in others).

Recommended tracks: "Repatriated" "What About Us?" "Cheap Music" "Bury Me Standing"

48. I'll Never Get out of This World Alive
Steve Earle
New West Records Inc.


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If Steve Earle’s 25-year music career isn’t self-explanatory enough in pointing out that he’s one of the best in the country music business, I’ll Never Get out of This World Alive may do the trick on its own. The album, named after the late Hank Williams song of the same name, is another solid body of Earle’s gritty, bluesy rock and roll and subdued country ballads. Suited to roadhouses and billiard halls, "Meet Me in the Alleyway" shows Earle at his sleekest with blues guitars and harmonicas. "Every Part of Me" is the album’s best ballad, though "Heaven or Hell"—the Dolly and Kenny-esque duet with Earle’s talented wife Allison Moorer—cannot be overlooked. The brassier "This City" combines southern sensibilities with a regal feel in the track that features what I'd consider the album’s best lyrics. There's nothing gimmicky about Steve Earle. His approach to country music is straight-up and conservative yet pays attention to details. The result is something well above the crap of the modern Nashville hit machine.

Recommended tracks: “Meet Me in the Alleyway” "Every Part of Me" "This City"

47. Past Life Martyred Saints
EMA
Souterrain Submissions


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On Past Life Martyred Saints, EMA (Erika M. Andersen) proves one of the most exciting up and coming musicians in any of today’s music scenes. With an experimental sound that is different on nearly every song, Kim Gordon-like vocals that span from rangy melodies ("Milkman") to spoken word ("California"), and lyrics that are direct and harsh at times and figuratively thoughtful at others, Past Life Martyred Saints paints the picture of a young artist that could become a number of different things. Formerly of drone folk band Gown, Andersen reveals herself at her punkiest on "Milkman," a song defined by sizeable vocal intervals on its chorus and distorted electric guitars. "California" exudes a dreamy toughness that reminds me of Sonic Youth’s "Tunic (Song for Karen)," from the band's Goo era. Her minimalism can also be heard in the beautiful and haunting "Breakfast." Other parts of the album are less refined and, in my opinion, just not as good. But at her finest moments, Andersen’s music emphasizes a power of word that, oddly enough, reminds me of Leonard Cohen.

Recommended tracks: "Milkman" "California" "Breakfast"

46. Sleep Beneath the Willow
Daniel Romano
Independent


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Anyone sick of the pick-up truck, redneck party, CMT-based manifestation of country music that prevails today would probably love Daniel Romano. With dreary, southern guitar licks; slow-moving ballads; and tales of heartbreak explained in the most simplistic and direct manner possible, Sleep Beneath the Willow has all the fixings of a classic '60s pop country album. A sense of empty bar with Hank Williams and Conway Twitty prevails throughout. Unequivocally a heartbreak album, Romano’s second solo release features similarly built songs (ballads with electric guitars, slides, and some harmonicas and fiddles). Exceptions include the gleeful "Helen’s Restaurant" and the acoustic "Nothing." Moreover, Romano is vocally impressive; his Hank Williams, bass/baritone-like approach on "Time Forgot (To Change My Heart)" sharply contrasts with the soaring melody on the chorus of "Hard on You." Musically, the album is sound, and its sense of old-time country heartbreak is authentic. Sleep Beneath the Willow that country music used to be a simple thing for simple people—before it started being like this.

Recommended tracks: "Hard on You" "Time Forgot (To Change My Heart)" "I Won’t Let It"

This post has been edited by RWG: Jan 2nd 2012, 4:56 PM


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RWG
post Jan 4th 2012, 1:19 AM
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45. Diaper Island
Chad VanGaalen
Flemish Eye


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Now with four albums to his name and a large role in the Calgary-based record label Flemish Eye, Chad VanGaalen has become a Godfather, of sorts, of Canadian campus radio. The program director at my station actually had to pass a memo to DJs requesting they play some albums—of which his was listed first—a little less and move onto newer material. Personally, I’ve always found him a bit overrated, but eventually, I can’t help but falling for some of the songs. "Peace on the Rise" is my favourite from Diaper Island. The dark, psychedelic song uses an eerie guitar riff that persists throughout the whole song, ghost-like wailing in the background between sections, and a chorus that becomes addicting after a few listens. "Sara," which VanGaalen’s rarely showcased fast vibrato, is also dark and haunting and a similar genre of "campfire psychedelic." The rest of the album is largely new wave, with faster songs and punk-suited guitars. Stylistically, these tracks are hard to decipher and not really worth picking apart, but they make for decent background hang out music. I don’t like any of these tracks as much as like his older song, "Willow Tree," and come to think of it, I think I have this album a bit too high (it should trade places with The Antlers’ Burst Apart, which I criminally underrated). Notwithstanding, I don’t know if any album was a bigger part of Canadian university culture this year.

Recommended tracks: "Peace on the Rise" "Sara"

44. The Fall
Gorillaz
EMI Records Ltd.


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Some fans and critics took The Fall, the fourth release by British digital band Gorillaz, a little too seriously. Released as a hard copy in April and digitally on Christmas day 2010 (for free), the band dropped it less than a year after they did Plastic Beach. Moreover, they didn’t even announce the album until five days before its digital release. It wasn’t highly anticipated, long awaited, or intended to be taken as a defining moment for the band. Rather, its description clearly paints the picture of a mere side-experiment album; Damon Albarn recorded all of the songs on his iPad during the band’s 2010 Escape to Plastic Beach tour. Perhaps the most striking thing about the album is how little sound quality is compromised in this "experiment." Yet while a large amount of discussion surrounds how the album was made and released, it does have its own themes and characteristics. Compared to Plastic Beach, The Fall is less of a hip-hop album and less of an album for dancing. I’d describe it as trippy and electronic, and oftentimes dreamy, but incorporating southern elements in subtle ways (many songs are about southern states and cities). Bobby Womack lends his vocals on the track "Bobby in Phoenix," which creates a smooth mix of R&B, country, and whatever it is Gorillaz deem their sound. "Amarillo" and the ukelele'd "Revolving Doors" are both toned down and moody but also incorporate a sense of future and mystery. "Phoner to Arizona" is entirely electronic and probably one the band’s more bizarre full tracks, but it exudes the "good kind of weird" people have come to expect from Gorillaz. Technically, I suppose I'd rank The Fall behind the other three Gorillaz albums, but I'd argue they haven’t had a bad one to date. They've been one of the last decade's most innovative musical acts, and even while making what we call a “piss album” by screwing around with an electronic device, it speaks to the reputation they've established that nobody hesitated in deeming this a serious release and judging it accordingly.

Recommended tracks: "Bobby in Phoenix" "Phoner to Arizona" "Revolving Doors" "Amarillo"

43. Demolished Thoughts
Thurston Moore
Matador Records


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Most recognize Sonic Youth as having become a little more polished during the band’s final era (they appear to be broken up, but I'd formally label their future "uncertain"). Rather Ripped, for example, showed more of a refined indie sound that suggested the band may have started—gasp—using sheet music. But Demolished Thoughts, Sonic Youth frontman Thurston Moore's third solo album, takes maturation another level. It is largely a chamber music album in which cellos and violins accompany Moore's voice, which, when melody-focussed and not shouting over ungodly distortions, comes across as a soft hush. This suits the songs like the sad and beautiful "Benediction" well. "Illumine" uses other elements (harps, acoustic strumming, strings) that show Moore's shift from head banger and performer to singer/songwriter. Beck-produced Demolished Thoughts does descend into a grungy-ness on other tracks, and many of the songs aren’t as softly sung as the first two are. I'd consider it experimental as a whole, but the notion of Sonic Youth songs with chamber music arrangements proves interesting, at least. Still, I’d call "Benediction" the album’s best song. The probably of its being written in the midst of his divorce with Kim makes it all the more heartbreaking. Aside: Thurston and Kim have to get back together to keep my view of marriage from going from 95 to 100% pejorative.

Recommended tracks: "Benediction" "Illumine"

42. 4
Beyoncé
Columbia Records


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I've always respected Beyoncé's celebrity. She's well-spoken, mature, successful by her own means, and gorgeous, and all things considered, I'd say she carries herself really well compared to most other chart toppers. But when I first heard her sing "1+1" on the season finale of American Idol and subsequently checked out her latest album and its story, I began to respect her more musically. The premise to 4 reminds me of that of Kelly Clarkson’s All I Ever Wanted; it comes out of the ashes of professional separation with management (Beyoncé with her father, Kelly with Clive Davis); it's highly personal on an artistic level; and even though it’s less geared for the clubs and commercial success, she made it anyways because she knew her fans would support her own artistic venture. The majority of the songs bring up an older form of mid-tempo R&B that doesn't usually translate into commercial success nowadays. Even the album's hits, such as "Countdown" and "Best Thing I Never Had," do not have the same top 40 club quality of a "Crazy in Love," or a "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)." For me, the album’s finest moments couldn’t come further away from club music. The album’s first song, "1+1," has the emotional approach and the continuous flow of a dreary, old-fashioned love ballad, and it features the most gut-wrenching vocal I've ever heard from her. "I Care" and "I Miss You" are vintage mid-tempo '80s songs, and "Best Thing I Never Had" sticks with this theme in a more radio-friendly matter. "Start Over" is another example of how Beyoncé holds nothing back vocally on 4. I find tracks like "Countdown" and "Run the World (Girls)" sort of obnoxious, but the album still reflects fine work, a strong sense of self, and an artistic venture that has to be applauded.

Recommended tracks: "1+1" "Best Thing I Never Had" "I Care"

41. Seeds
Hey Rosetta!
Sonic Records Ltd.


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I instantly fell in love with Hey Rosetta!’s sound when I heard this album. It features a youthful energy and a flare that is distinctly east-coast indie rock. With an emphasis on strings and horns, there’s an Arcade Fire-like fullness to Seeds, but it has a more down-to-earth maritime feel than the theatrical A.F. "Yer Spring," the album’s most brilliant track, exemplifies this. It features a strong use of dynamics and eventually explodes in an inspiring apex. "Yer Fall" features a similar use of dynamics and an incremental approach to songwriting that I'd say highlights the album. Other standouts include "Seeds" and "New Sum (Nous Sommes)," but the album as a whole is solid and features few tracks that merit skipping. The band's hometown of St. John’s, Newfoundland, is exactly the place from which you'd guess such a sound originate. It exudes young vibes and warmth through a brand of indie rock that is distinctly maritime. The richness and the robust feel give Hey Rosetta! a unique feel that meshes pop music, stadium rock largeness, and traditional folk elements. I love it, and I'm not at east coast guy in the least.

Recommended tracks: "Yer Spring" "Yer Fall" "Seeds"


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DiAnAmItE4LiFe
post Jan 4th 2012, 4:43 AM
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QUOTE(RWG @ Dec 30th 2011, 6:35 PM) *

I never really listened to Viva la Vida in full. I remember the only thing that stood out to me on X&Y was "Fix You," but maybe that's my favourite song by them.

What does "stanning" mean? tongue.gif Sorry, slow over here.


It's definitely my favorite, although I won't argue with anyone who says that A Rush of Blood to the Head or Parachutes are better. I really liked what they were going for with X&Y, but some of the songs fall a little flat.

A "stan" is basically like a really big fan of someone or a "super fan", I guess. haha.gif

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I haven't heard that City and Colour album, but I do know who they are, so I might check it out. And I really want to listen to "Sleep Beneath the Willow" now, that sounds like something I'd like. shocked.gif

I haven't listened to 4 in full, but I like all the songs I've heard (the only one I'm not crazy about is Run the World). I listened to 1+1 again the other day and really liked it. And I think Love On Top is one of her best songs ever.


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*Wallace
post Jan 4th 2012, 2:42 PM
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Oooh I know R.E.M. and Gorillaz. Ooh whoa the R.E.M. album is a greatest hits album? I know and love Losing my Religion and Everybody Hurts. yes.gif As fir the Gorillaz, their songs sound really relaxing. But yeah these songs sound a bit different from what I was expecting from them.

But wooooooo Beyoncé!!! spaz.gif I wasn't expecting to see her album on here but I am certainly happy to see 4 on her. This is one of the very few albums i listened to of course and I love it! heart.gif Loving your comments about how you always respect her celebrity and everything else you said to describe her her, which I agree with. yes.gif Oooh at her album premise reminding you of Kelly's AIEW. shocked.gif But yes this album is very different from her other albums and less commercial/club-like. The album in is very soulful/R&B and she sounds amazing on it. I agree with your comments on 1+1. I love all the songs you mentioned here so woohoo! bobo.gif Ahh yes, I love "Start Over." So amazing and she sounds amazing on that song. heart.gif Aww Countdown and RTWG are funbut agreed with this sentence "the album still reflects fine work, a strong sense of self, and an artistic venture that has to be applauded.." yes.gif


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ai13: emily. malaya. caleb. kristen. dexter. jessica. jena. | dwts18: meryl/maks. charlie/sharna. amy/derek. danica/val. candace/mark. james/peta. cody/witney. | tar24: brendon/rachel. caroline/jennifer. dave/connor. | sur28: tasha. spencer. woo. morgan. | bbc2: ika. neda. adel. jon. heather. | sytycdau4: patric. ashleigh. jay. maddie. michael. renelle. lauren. eden. blond. | credit: Elliott for the av.
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RWG
post Jan 4th 2012, 10:02 PM
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QUOTE(DiAnAmItE4LiFe @ Jan 4th 2012, 1:43 AM) *

It's definitely my favorite, although I won't argue with anyone who says that A Rush of Blood to the Head or Parachutes are better. I really liked what they were going for with X&Y, but some of the songs fall a little flat.

A "stan" is basically like a really big fan of someone or a "super fan", I guess. haha.gif

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I haven't heard that City and Colour album, but I do know who they are, so I might check it out. And I really want to listen to "Sleep Beneath the Willow" now, that sounds like something I'd like. shocked.gif

I haven't listened to 4 in full, but I like all the songs I've heard (the only one I'm not crazy about is Run the World). I listened to 1+1 again the other day and really liked it. And I think Love On Top is one of her best songs ever.

Hmm... I've never heard anyone say Parachutes is their best, but I'd certainly entertain the thought. "Don't Panic" and "Yellow" are great and often forgotten.

He. tongue.gif He had a kind of big hit with "Sleeping Sickness" a few years ago, but his new music is stronger. And I'd definitely recommend Daniel Romano if you like that kind of country. Try "Hard on You."

Alrighty. Gotcha. tongue.gif

QUOTE(*Wallace @ Jan 4th 2012, 11:42 AM) *

Oooh I know R.E.M. and Gorillaz. Ooh whoa the R.E.M. album is a greatest hits album? I know and love Losing my Religion and Everybody Hurts. yes.gif As fir the Gorillaz, their songs sound really relaxing. But yeah these songs sound a bit different from what I was expecting from them.

But wooooooo Beyoncé!!! spaz.gif I wasn't expecting to see her album on here but I am certainly happy to see 4 on her. This is one of the very few albums i listened to of course and I love it! heart.gif Loving your comments about how you always respect her celebrity and everything else you said to describe her her, which I agree with. yes.gif Oooh at her album premise reminding you of Kelly's AIEW. shocked.gif But yes this album is very different from her other albums and less commercial/club-like. The album in is very soulful/R&B and she sounds amazing on it. I agree with your comments on 1+1. I love all the songs you mentioned here so woohoo! bobo.gif Ahh yes, I love "Start Over." So amazing and she sounds amazing on that song. heart.gif Aww Countdown and RTWG are funbut agreed with this sentence "the album still reflects fine work, a strong sense of self, and an artistic venture that has to be applauded.." yes.gif

Yep. Just this year, they released a new album, broke up, and put out a Best of. Those are two of their best songs. I usually think of Gorillaz more as party music. ("Dare" is my favourite song for dancing at the bar. I think you'd like it.) But you're totally right. A lot of their songs are more relaxing and chill, especially on the new album.

I knew you'd like that. You probably know more about her than I do and are more suited to comment on her than I am, but I'm glad you found my write-up somewhat accurate. "Start Over" is a great vocal, and that's really what made me like "1+1" too. She sounds like she's able to belt more from the top of her voice when she's not doing club- and dance-type songs. I wouldn't label myself a fan of hers just based on the kind of music I listen to, but she's easy to respect.


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*Wallace
post Jan 5th 2012, 1:05 AM
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QUOTE(RWG @ Jan 4th 2012, 10:02 PM) *

Yep. Just this year, they released a new album, broke up, and put out a Best of. Those are two of their best songs. I usually think of Gorillaz more as party music. ("Dare" is my favourite song for dancing at the bar. I think you'd like it.) But you're totally right. A lot of their songs are more relaxing and chill, especially on the new album.

I knew you'd like that. You probably know more about her than I do and are more suited to comment on her than I am, but I'm glad you found my write-up somewhat accurate. "Start Over" is a great vocal, and that's really what made me like "1+1" too. She sounds like she's able to belt more from the top of her voice when she's not doing club- and dance-type songs. I wouldn't label myself a fan of hers just based on the kind of music I listen to, but she's easy to respect.

Oooh that's interesting. I remember hearing about them breaking up recently although I forgot when that was. Ooh I never heard "Dare" before but LOL @ predicting I would like it. But you're totally right. I already really like this song a lot, more so than the other songs of theirs from this year. It's a fun danceable song. bobo.gif

Aww you did a great job commenting on her and this album. I'm a huge fan as you know but I approve of what you said yes.gif Agreed with what you're saying on her voice. She can def belt from the top of her voice and while she doesn't showcase that often in her uptempo/dance-type songs, she really shows that off in her ballads. I'm glad she does so in many of her songs on this album. I'm glad she impressed you on that end and that you respect her as an artist. grin.gif


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post Jan 7th 2012, 4:33 AM
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40. Rome
Danger Mouse and Daniele Luppi
Parlophone


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Prior to its release, Rome had a lot to be excited about: it took five years to produce; it’s composed by two big names in production circles in Danger Mouse (the other half of Gnarls Barkley and a producer for Gorillaz and Beck) and Italian film scorer Daniele Luppi; it brings in two of the most credited voices in modern pop music in Jack White and Norah Jones; and the idea of fitting the album to a spaghetti western theme appeared a smart way of stylizing an album with such varied collaborators. Rome isn’t as impressive as its description, but as a whole, it's still quite a fresh album. It's an interesting mixture of western and Italian themes, about half of which are spruced up with the vocals of White and Jones, and songs connote mostly moods of danger and mystery. "The Rose with the Broken Neck" is well suited to the more current throwback southern producer Jack White has become since disbanding the White Stripes, and it captures the album’s mission statement well. Notwithstanding, the psychological "Two Against One" is probably his best—or at least his most popular—track on the album. Norah Jones shines on "Problem Queen," which is probably my favourite album on the album, and "Black" proves her sultry voice a smart choice for this kind of music. That said, none of the songs show off either artists at their bests. Tracks like "The Gambling Priest" and "Theme of Rome" are alluring instrumentals suited to a Tarantino score (if not a Bond flic). That said, the notion of making "movie music" (note the album's cover mimics a movie poster) without an album to score it to proves somewhat of a wasted venture; for a modern audience, these kinds of song need scenes and actions, and I don't think these artists' kind of audience knows enough about spaghetti westerns to conjure them up on their own (I sure don't). Rome is great thematically, and features some nice work musically, but they may have needed a little longer than the five years they took to truly make this work.

Recommended tracks: "Problem Queen" (feat. Norah Jones) "Two Against One" (feat. Jack White) "Black" (Norah Jones) "The Rose with the Broken Neck" (feat. Jack White) "The Gambling Priest"

39. Unpersons
The Pack A.D.
Mint Records Inc.


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For anyone who worships Jimi Hendrix, already misses the White Stripes, finds The Black Keys a little too clean for his or her tastes, and has a secret sweet spot for Tracy Chapman, I present The Pack A.D. Now four albums deep, the female duo is defined by their brand of heavy-hitting blues from the garage. Unpersons is slightly more garage rock and a little less bluesy in terms, but its fuzzy riffs, alleyway guitar walk-downs, gritty female vocals, and head-banging grunginess is quite refreshing in the realm of an underground music scene dominated by innocuous indie rock. I didn’t get into this album off the bat, but it certainly comes through by the end. "Poisitronic" is the album's primary high-volume rock-out moment (vocalist Becky Black herself urges us to "turn it off, crank it up, and try to start again" in the song’s lyric). The sultry "Take" may prove some of the sexiest punk rock you’ve ever heard, and "Seasick" is the authentic-sounding, toned-down blues rock track. "Ride" showcases the band’s rough and mean side at its finest. This band's sound is incredibly refreshing, and Becky Black’s voice is the sexiest going in rock and roll.

Recommended tracks: "Poisitronic" "Seasick" "Take" "Ride"

38. Cults
Cults
In the Name Of (Columbia Records)


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Summer album of the year may go to New York City indie-pop duo Cults. And by that, I don't mean that they released the best album between the months of June and September (though they could be up there), but rather that their debut album features an infectious and relatively innocuous brand of pop-rock that is best suited for that time of year. Melanie Follin’s young-sounding voice suits the album's moods of perky, dreamy, romantic, and upbeat. For a pair of unknowns releasing a debut album, Cults enjoyed a staggering level of immediate success, especially for an indie band. Finding their way onto the segment of Columbia Records that Lily Allen runs probably helps, but Cults is a strong start in its own right. The album's first three songs in particular paint the picture of a definite up-and-coming name in rock and roll. The fast-paced and explosive "Abducted" is buffered by the slow-rolling hooks in "Go Outside" and the sappy "You Know What I Mean," which sounds like a '60s blue-eyed soul ballad. Usually, three strong tracks back-to-back-to-back is enough to win over a first-time listener when he or she puts on an album from the start, and in this case, I think it does. The album is definitely front-loaded, but "Bumper" and "Most Wanted" are also easy to get in to. The rest of the album proves consistent, and while the rest of the songs aren't as striking, I don't think the album ever really lags. It’s impressive how this album just doesn’t seem to run out of catchy melodies.

Recommended tracks: "Abducted" "Go Outside" "You Know What I Mean" "Most Wanted" "Bumper"

37. C'mon
Low
Sub Pop Records


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One of two things happened to the prominent indie bands of the '90s: they disbanded and became heralded king of queens of the anti-big label movement, or they kept making music and used their longevity as a marketing tool. For the Duluth, Minnesota,-based Low, however, neither seems to be the case; somehow, they've continued making music without any major rise in fame or even notability. If C'mon, their ninth album, is any indication, this proves a mystery to me given its quality. Beautiful, haunting, and icy, C'mon reflects a kind of polish you'd expect from a band that has been making music for 18 years. Their brand of indie rock, which is usually classified under the subgenre slowcore, is based on crisp electric guitar licks and strumming patterns, striking melodies that often jump hefty intervals, thoughtful harmonies, jazzy drumming, and, of course, slow tempos. The product, a dark but beautiful sepulchral feel, coordinates well with the fact they recorded C'mon in an old Duluth church. For me, the album's centrepiece is "Nightingale"; the continuous guitar riff is haunting, the lyrics are chilling, the melody is beautifully assimilated to that of a traditional American folk ballad, and drummer Mimi Parker’s harmonies accompany nicely. If you appreciate minimalism, you may find this the best night-time track of 2011. The peaceful "Try To Sleep" proves the album’s most accessible track in utilizing a song structure and dreaminess not unlike that of Coldplay’s "Yellow" (the popularity of "Try To Sleep" is due in part to John Stamos' appearance in its video). The emotionally deeper "Especially Me" and "Witches" exude Low's "cold" brand of indie rock and are additional highlights. With its high level of professionalism conjoining with its artistic beauty, C'mon provides a near spiritual experience and supports the notion that Low's being one of America’s most under-appreciated rock acts.

Recommended tracks: "Especially Me" "Nightingale" "Try To Sleep" "Witches"

36. Bon Iver
Bon Iver
Jagjaguwar


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Despite what its self-titling and its Grammy nomination for Best New Artist would lead you to believe, Bon Iver is actually the band's (usually erroneously referred to as a solo artist) follow up. I'm not a huge fan of straight folk music, and their first album For Emma, Forever Ago sort of proves why. It's a relatively uniform collection of coffee shop folk songs that aren't terribly interesting after you’ve heard the first one. The fact I went into their second album knowing it wasn’t for me made it all the more pleasing; from start to finish, Bon Iver blew me away. It still isn’t my favourite kind of music, but on this album, the Wisconsin band reinvents both themselves and the genre of folk music as I understand it. It's innovative, beautiful, and interesting. I love how they use so many different sounds and instruments in preserving one style throughout the whole ten songs. And unlike the first album, none of these songs' music can be reproduced identically at a campfire. I'd call this a decorated kind of minimalism, whereas the first album was just conservative. One positive the band carries over from the first album is its brilliant lyrics, as heard on "Calgary": "Pincher with the skin inside / You pinned me with your black sphere eyes / You know that all the rope's untied / I was only for to die beside." I love their use of city names for track titles and the ambiguous—if not completely arbitrary—connection they bear to the songs' lyrics. As a kicker, Bon Iver winds up being 2011’s proverbial "have your cake and eat it too album." Like Arcade Fire did last year with their album The Suburbs, Bon Iver broke into mainstream and achieved universal recognition without tweeking themselves as artists at all. The Grammy's annual indie band sweepstakes are quite random when you think about it.

Recommended tracks: "Calgary" "Perth" "Holocene" "Minnesota, WI"

This post has been edited by RWG: Jan 8th 2012, 5:48 PM


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post Jan 7th 2012, 4:39 AM
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QUOTE(*Wallace @ Jan 4th 2012, 10:05 PM) *

Oooh that's interesting. I remember hearing about them breaking up recently although I forgot when that was. Ooh I never heard "Dare" before but LOL @ predicting I would like it. But you're totally right. I already really like this song a lot, more so than the other songs of theirs from this year. It's a fun danceable song. bobo.gif

Aww you did a great job commenting on her and this album. I'm a huge fan as you know but I approve of what you said yes.gif Agreed with what you're saying on her voice. She can def belt from the top of her voice and while she doesn't showcase that often in her uptempo/dance-type songs, she really shows that off in her ballads. I'm glad she does so in many of her songs on this album. I'm glad she impressed you on that end and that you respect her as an artist. grin.gif

Nice! Glad you like it. Yes, it's a lot of fun to dance to. The female singer's parts make that song for me.

Thanks so much Wallace. grin.gif Means a lot coming from you.


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post Jan 7th 2012, 8:27 PM
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Love Cults. I don't think their album is that front loaded. I think it's strong throughout. Never Heal Myself and Never Saw the Point are two of my favorites from the album.


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post Jan 7th 2012, 9:15 PM
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I love Hey Rosetta!, and it's nice to seem them get some recognition (especially from a west-coaster tongue.gif.) I've agreed with quite a bit of your list so far, and you've given me a lot of new music to check out!


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post Jan 8th 2012, 5:44 PM
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QUOTE(TiredOfSex @ Jan 7th 2012, 5:27 PM) *

Love Cults. I don't think their album is that front loaded. I think it's strong throughout. Never Heal Myself and Never Saw the Point are two of my favorites from the album.

Like I said, I don't think it ever really wavers, but I think the best and most popular songs are the first four.

QUOTE(clay_aikens_dancer @ Jan 7th 2012, 6:15 PM) *

I love Hey Rosetta!, and it's nice to seem them get some recognition (especially from a west-coaster tongue.gif.) I've agreed with quite a bit of your list so far, and you've given me a lot of new music to check out!

Thanks! I don't discriminate. tongue.gif Glad you like the list.

I'll post the next part tonight or tomorrow.


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post Jan 10th 2012, 2:32 AM
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35. The Year of Hibernation
Youth Lagoon
Fat Possum Records


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As the name implies, The Year of Hibernation is a great album for "taking a year off," as high-school graduates say, or more generally, getting away from chaos. Its songs have a peaceful, therapeutic effect and an innocent feel to them, yet many of them are catchy through basic indie pop means: between the oh oh ohs in "Cannons" and the melodic whistling in "Afternoons" (which in undoubtedly the best whistle song I've heard since 2006's "Young Folks" by Peter, Bjorn, and John), Youth Lagoon (stage name of Trevor Towers) uses a simple and minimalistic approach on these songs (hinted at by the one-word song titles). Most often, the songs are basic indie rock and electronic tracks made light and playful, but even when synthetic and using electric drums ("Daydream"), The Year of Hibernation isn’t overbearing in the least. Based on the musical elements he uses, Youth Lagoon is easy to tag with an elaborate subgenre such as chillwave or dream pop, but his minimalistic approach, simple lyrics, juvenile trends, and ways of making his songs catchy despite a largely unmelodic voice reduces this album's pretentiousness. It's a fine listen for simple people.

Recommended tracks: "Afternoons" "Cannons" "Posters"

34. I'm with You
Red Hot Chili Peppers
Warner Bros. Records Inc.


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I've gone through the rounds with Red Hot Chilli Peppers. I thought they were gods when I was in my early teens, fun but kind of dumb in high school, and nonsense when I started university. I'm at a point now where I respect them for being the biggest band in modern rock for the past twenty years and for taking an approach to rock music that is mainly just fun and certainly different. Yes, a lot of their placing on this list can be attributed to that. But based on I'm with You, I think you can almost make the case the the Chilis are maturing. When I first heard "The Adventures of Rain Dance Maggie," the album's requisite radio hit, I thought it was a fun, catchy party song with bad lyrics to the extent of "tick tock, I want to rock you like the '80s, / Cock blocking isn't allowed." Structurally, it sounds like too much of a "Dani California" (which they were accused of plagiarizing from Tom Petty's "Last Dance with Mary Jane" to begin with) revisited and a bit of a waste of a cool baseline. However, judging the entire album on a song their label probably made them release would be selling its thoughtful side short. Underneath the single lies some tracks that, by modern rock standards, carry actual meaning. "Police Station" is genuinely sad. "Meet Me at the Corner" exudes a similar kind of sensibility I didn’t know they add. These two tracks are my favourites. Much of the album is a less chartable brand of funky rock and roll; "Monarchy of Roses" could almost be considered disco, and "Even You Brutus?" uses an Elton John kind of swagger. I’m with You still has all the fixings of a west-coast patio party, but it features some of their most thoughtful songs since "Under the Bridge." I'm excited to see what becomes of the Chilis, sober, pressing their 50s, and done being wild, as they become and old men and pour their decades of insight and experience into more mature forms of song. Moments of I'm with You offer a very slight glimpse as to what that may look like, but at the same time, they're still sound like they have all the energy they've always had.

Recommended tracks: "Police Station" "Meet Me at the Corner" “The Adventures of Rain Dance Maggie” "Even You, Brutus?"

33. The Place I Left Behind
The Deep Dark Woods
Six Shooter Records


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This album has a fairly simple premise: songs about coming back to the place you grew up. The Place I Left Behind is full of small town sensibilities, both lyrically and musically (finger-plucking and fiddles characterize many of the songs with a mixture of folk and country). The Deep Dark Woods, who have now released four studio albums, are from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, but their sound is as much East Coast quaint as it is prairie barnyard. "West Side Street" is the most robust-sounding track and draws a bit on My Morning Jacket’s simpler, less psychedelic music. The rest of the album is sad and solemn ("The Place I Left Behind" is a more bleak look at the small town), bluesy ("Back Alley Blues," "Virginia"), and gleeful ("Sugar Mama"). As a whole, The Place I Left Behind evokes a wide range of emotions, no matter where you grew up. The conservative, coming-of-age approach it takes to folk rock is refreshing, and the album' musical themes are simple and easy to get in to.

Recommended tracks: "West Side Street" "Sugar Mama" "Virginia" "The Place I Left Behind"

32. The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams
Various Artists
Sony Music Entertainment


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The Lost Notebook of Hank Williams is a truly unique premise for a compilation. This is not a cover album—not technically. The songs use lyrics from Williams' notebooks that were discovered after his death. The lyrics were never recorded or even developed into songs. The notebook eventually found its way into Sony's hands and was subsequently passed along to Bob Dylan, who gathered a group of artists to develop Williams' lyrics into songs and record them. Thus, you get the genius of one of the greatest songwriters of all time and a sense of novelty in the renditions of contemporary recording artists. But unlike regular cover songs, usually criticized as bastardized rip-offs inducing to such and such’s rolling in the grave, there is no precedent set here because, while Williams wrote the songs, they never technically existed. The artists on this tribute album, which includes Bob Dylan, Norah Jones, Jack White, Lucinda Williams, Alan Jackson, Sheryl Crow, and more, do a good job of developing the original artist's lyrics into vintage, old-fashioned country tracks that actually sound like real Hank Williams songs. Most of the artists show a strong grasp of the way Williams wrote melodies and structured songs. On the better recordings, the only thing that is different is the voice. Jack White's song, in particular, is right on the money. The first half of the album features the bigger names and the more authentic-sounding, and frankly, better tracks. The latter half sounds more modern and like the artists took more liberties. The Lost Notebook of Hank Williams is a fascinating blend of old and new. It's a unique project that offers these artists an opportunity they’ll never again: use lyrics by a musical legend without being held to his original version's precedent.

Recommended tracks: "You Know That I Know" (Jack White) "The Love That Faded" (Bob Dylan) "I'm So Happy I Found You" (Lucinda Williams) "You've Been Lonesome Too" (Alan Jackson) "How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart?" (Norah Jones)

31. Several Shades of Why
J Mascis
Sub Pop Records


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When I say Dinosaur Jr., you probably think "Feel the Pain," the timeless video in which two men drive around Manhattan in a golf cart launching golf balls out of commonplaces, the creepy covers, and the '90s slacker culture. Beyond its cartoony album cover, J Mascis' first solo album comprising entirely new material couldn't be a further cry from that. For one, Several Shades of Why is almost completely acoustic. But Mascis’ general demeanour also shifts: his brand of acoustic is not hazy, stoned, lethargic, or slacker-like, but rather clean, refreshed, and polished. I generally get bored with completely acoustic albums and usually just enjoy acoustic takes on songs I already know, but Several Shades of Why proves a different experience. Every track sounds natural. The lyrics are sad—sometimes genuinely upsetting—and memorable. The arrangements are simple and concise. In fact, Mascis' voice sounds much better suited to this kind of music than it does to the more manic rockband grunge he still makes with Dinosaur Jr. The title track is a heartbreaking display of light acoustic strumming, strings, and confessional lyrics: "Got away this time, why should I have to answer / Several shades of why I can't go back, it's faster / Don't expect it 'cause the ending's a disaster / Nothing nothing nothing man, a little laughter with my time.” It's one of the most beautiful and saddest songs of the year for me. "Is It Done?" and "Not Enough" (featuring Kurt Vile and Sophie Trudeau) are slightly more perky but still use the same greyish kind of mood. With sparingly used electric guitars, "Can I" is the album's anomaly and its hardest-sounding track. Several Shades of Why just has a certain conviction about it that makes it so genuine.

Recommended tracks: "Several Shades of Why" "Is it Done?" "Not Enough" "Can I"


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post Jan 10th 2012, 2:57 AM
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QUOTE(RWG @ Jan 4th 2012, 10:02 PM) *

Hmm... I've never heard anyone say Parachutes is their best, but I'd certainly entertain the thought. "Don't Panic" and "Yellow" are great and often forgotten.

He. tongue.gif He had a kind of big hit with "Sleeping Sickness" a few years ago, but his new music is stronger. And I'd definitely recommend Daniel Romano if you like that kind of country. Try "Hard on You."

Alrighty. Gotcha. tongue.gif


I've heard a few people say it's their best, and they've "only gotten worse since then", which I definitely don't believe. haha.gif But Parachutes is awesome for sure, I just kinda have to be in the right mood to listen to it. But I totally agree, those are great songs. Another one that's sometimes forgotten is Shiver. It's one of my favorites. heart.gif

Oops. haha.gif I should know better! But okay, I'll do that! yes.gif

I haven't heard any of the albums you've posted lately, I really wish I had listened to more new music last year like I did in 2010. closedeyes.gif


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post Jan 10th 2012, 11:58 AM
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Ooh I heard RHCP's single a few months ago but forgot all about it and that they came back with an album. lmao.gif Anywho I really like the first two songs of theirs you listed. I'm so used to them being so fun and stuff but their slower songs are really nice too. And I LOVE "Under the Bridge" so yeah.

I liked the Lucidiana Williams song too. innocent.gif But yeah I haven't heard any of these albums either. laughing.gif


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post Jan 10th 2012, 11:32 PM
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QUOTE(DiAnAmItE4LiFe @ Jan 9th 2012, 11:57 PM) *

I've heard a few people say it's their best, and they've "only gotten worse since then", which I definitely don't believe. haha.gif But Parachutes is awesome for sure, I just kinda have to be in the right mood to listen to it. But I totally agree, those are great songs. Another one that's sometimes forgotten is Shiver. It's one of my favorites. heart.gif

Oops. haha.gif I should know better! But okay, I'll do that! yes.gif

I haven't heard any of the albums you've posted lately, I really wish I had listened to more new music last year like I did in 2010. closedeyes.gif

I can imagine someone saying they liked a band better in the early days, but Coldplay has definitely improved as musicians and instrumentalists. A lot of their newer songs sound more intricate, but I do like Parachutes for its simplicity.

I don't think I've ever listened to as much new music in my life as I did in 2011. I was always checking out newer artists when I was younger but got into older stuff the past few years.

QUOTE(*Wallace @ Jan 10th 2012, 8:58 AM) *

Ooh I heard RHCP's single a few months ago but forgot all about it and that they came back with an album. lmao.gif Anywho I really like the first two songs of theirs you listed. I'm so used to them being so fun and stuff but their slower songs are really nice too. And I LOVE "Under the Bridge" so yeah.

I liked the Lucidiana Williams song too. innocent.gif But yeah I haven't heard any of these albums either. laughing.gif

Their slower songs ("Californication," "Soul To Squeeze," "Scar Tissue") are definitely the better ones for me too.

Yay! She's great. But damn at the second part. The next segment isn't the most recognizable, but the one after it might be? tongue.gif


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30. Hard Times
Himalayan Bear
Absolutely Kosher Records


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This may be the most cache album on the list. I hate jumping to a comparison with a good musician, but Hard Times reminds me way too much of Jeff Buckley to not bring it up. To clarify, I don’t consider early Radiohead, Coldplay, or other Britpop descendents to be anything like Jeff Buckley, even though they're often compared for male falsetto vocals and the fact they make music alone. Not only does Himalayan Bear frontman Ryan Beattie’s match Buckley’s quivers and low drawls well, but like in many of Buckley’s songs, the music produces a dark, mysterious, bluesy feel I find captivating. The seven tracks are fairly minimalistic; the first half of the album features steadier structures with thick blues guitars, and the latter half progresses into more experimental regions. The first track, "Hard Times," could be said to be at the other end of a continuum than the last one, "Man on Fire," but by the time you get to the timid last track, you're already completely drawn into the album. Jeff Buckley has to be a vocal influence, but it's refreshing to get the feelings his legendary voice exudes without sacrificing the darkness and desperation of his songs, like the Britpop bands that ran with his vocal mannerisms did. Even on its own, Hard Times is a creative album musically: bluesy-sounding guitars and horns are often at the forefront, but many other instruments and elements are fused together. It doesn't spell out one particular genre but shows touches of blues, country, pop, and weird subgenres. It's a distinct and moody album.

Recommended tracks: "Hard Times" "The Caballo" "How Could Death Contend" "Only Dreams Let Me Hold You"

29. Rave On Buddy Holly
Various Artists
Concord Music Group Inc.


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To use a sports analogy, I don't think I've ever heard of such a "stacked" compilation album before. I mean, this is one deep bench. With a star-studded line-up featuring Paul McCartney, The Black Keys, Lou Reed, Fiona Apple, Florence + The Machine, Cee Lo Green, Julian Casablancas, Patti Smith, My Morning Jacket, Modest Mouse, She & Him, and more, Rave On Buddy Holly reaps the benefits of a cast that sells itself. Named after one of Buddy Holly's best-known hits, this tribute album is a great deal of fun to put on; true to form, it's mostly upbeat, and most of the artists do a great job of fitting the theme while remaining recognizable and distinct. Moreover, it's a great bridging album for kids and parents. Even if neither like Buddy Holly, it's still a broad look at modern pop and indie rock artists through innocuous and enjoyable old-time rock and roll songs. Paul McCartney schools everyone on "It's So Easy," a song he's been performing for decades but revamps with a grungier, more distorted take take on Rave On. Justin Townes Earle (son of Steve Earle) has gotten me into "Maybe Baby," and The Black Keys have done the same with "Dearest." Cee Le Green’s "(You’re So Square) Baby I Don’t Care" has great '50s flavour, and Zooey DesChanel’s voice suits the jumpy "Oh Boy!" well. The most glaring exception to the album's upbeat nature is My Morning Jacket's take on "True Love Ways," which uses strings and harps to create a classic romantic feel. If you don’t know anything about Buddy Holly's music and get the sense it would bore you (which was me before I heard this), this compilation offers a thorough 101 to a true rock and roll legend.

Recommended tracks: "It's So Easy" (Paul McCartney) "Maybe Baby" (Justin Townes Earle) "Dearest" (The Black Keys) "True Love Ways" (My Morning Jacket) "(You’re So Square) Baby I Don’t Care" (Cee Lo Green) "Oh Boy!" (She & Him)

28. Strange Mercy
St. Vincent
4AD


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Annie Clark has one of those voices that can convey any kind of emotion. On Strange Mercy, her third album, she uses it fully. Clark, the Dallas-born artist who performs under the stage name St. Vincent, has a stringy and elegant-sounding voice that exudes both old and new. It meshes well between rich falsettos and low, nearly spoken utterances. This is best heard on "Cruel," the sunny track with the infectious guitar riff that she plays herself at live shows. "Cruel" is catchy to the point of sin and joyful by nature. However, this clashes with the moods of the rest of the album, which ranges widely in itself. The distorted "Cheerleader" is desperate and gritty and much less danceable. "Surgeon" is trippy and soothing. "Dilettante" mixes dreary, sexy vocals with an intense, march-like quality in the drumming. However, I think these are all trumped by the more electronic-based title track. The beautiful arrangement and sexy vocals with which she sings of her "lost boys" create a striking moment. Clark’s rangy voice, the guitar work, and the moodiness definitely make this album. I hadn't heard St. Vincent prior to this, but Strange Mercy ended up being a great find.

Recommended tracks: "Cruel" "Strange Mercy" "Cheerleader" "Dilettante"

27. A Treasure
Neil Young and The International Harvesters
Silver Bow Productions Inc.


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Neil Young has done the rounds musically: he's veered from southern rock to electronic to experimental to a brand of hard rock that has earned him the title of "Grand-daddy of Grunge." But as polarizing as country is as a genre, its simple barnyard appeal featured on A Treasure, the most recent addition to Young's Archives Performance Series, offers some of his most agreeable music he's ever made. It may seem disingenuous having an artist who didn't technically record any music in 2011 up so high on a list about 2011 in music, but Neil Young is possibly my favourite artist of all time, and this is some of his finest stuff. As the album's name suggests, this timeless collection of recordings is something of which the 2011 music world was in dire need. The performances on A Treasure, which were recorded during his 1984-1985 tour with the International Harvesters, use fiddles, finger-cap sliding, and Johnny Cash’s signature base-note strum patterns to create an old-fashioned brand of country music that wouldn’t sound out of place in Hazzard Country. The album gives gleeful accounts of simple love stories ("Bound for Glory" "Let Your Fingers Do the Walking") while Buffalo Springfield's "Flying on the Ground Is Wrong" is revamped into the perfect countryfield slow-dance tune.

Recommended tracks: "Flying on the Ground Is Wrong" "Bound for Glory" "Amber Jean" "Are You Ready for the Country?" "Let Your Fingers Do the Walkin'"

26. Hurry Up, We're Dreaming
M83
Naïve


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In case you haven’t noticed, I'm exceptionally bad at writing about electronic music, so here’s an obtuse stab at an album some are calling one of the best of the year. I listened to a few songs from 2008's Saturdays = Youth and never got into the French band M83, but Hurry Up, We're Dreaming dramatizes things to the point at which it becomes striking to anyone capable of emotions, regardless of whether or not they like electronic. Electronic has the capacity to do that—damn it. "Midnight City"—frontman Anthony Gonzalez's account of downtown Los Angeles at night—is a thrilling nighttime track with driving verses, explosive choruses, and an incredible riff. Not only is it a dynamic-sounding track, but it exudes powerful feelings of youth and energy. If I can continue cataloging based on adjectives, it's the most exciting song of 2011. Hurry Up, We're Dreaming features other strong uptempo tracks (the Duran Duran-esque "Reunion" and "New Map"), but the slowed down "My Tears Are Becoming a Sea" shows a powerful ambiance that blew me away on first listen. "Wait" is almost as beautiful, and "Intro" has the added appeal of a guest appearance by Zola Jesus. In general, there's just incredible ambiance on this album that blends synth and electronic elements with a wide variety of instruments. If you’re looking to wade your way into electronic music with an album that is both accessible and credible, this is the one for you.

Recommended tracks: "Midnight City" "My Tears Are Becoming a Sea" "Wait" "Reunion"

This post has been edited by RWG: Jan 14th 2012, 2:16 AM


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*Wallace
post Jan 14th 2012, 11:21 AM
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QUOTE(RWG @ Jan 10th 2012, 11:32 PM) *

Their slower songs ("Californication," "Soul To Squeeze," "Scar Tissue") are definitely the better ones for me too.

Yay! She's great. But damn at the second part. The next segment isn't the most recognizable, but the one after it might be? tongue.gif

Ooh yes, I love Californication too. yes.gif

Awwww. haha.gif But lol yeah I don't know any of the 30-26 albums. blushing.gif But ooh whoa a Buddy Holly compilation album with all those artists. shocked.gif That seems really cool. I like the Cee Lo Green and Paul McCartney songs. yes.gif


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RWG
post Jan 14th 2012, 3:59 PM
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QUOTE(*Wallace @ Jan 14th 2012, 8:21 AM) *

Ooh yes, I love Californication too. yes.gif

Awwww. haha.gif But lol yeah I don't know any of the 30-26 albums. blushing.gif But ooh whoa a Buddy Holly compilation album with all those artists. shocked.gif That seems really cool. I like the Cee Lo Green and Paul McCartney songs. yes.gif

I'm glad you like those two! And at least you keep following. huggy.gif


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#jeah
post Jan 14th 2012, 5:01 PM
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I'm following your list, I promise! haha.gif I just don't know 90% of these albums blushing.gif


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